Monday, May 21, 2018

Certified Reference Standards and Custom Mixtures | Greyhound Chromatography

Periodic Table and flasks

Whatever the mix - if you want it, we will customise it. Having something customised need not be an outrageous request - almost anything is possible! 

If you have any specific product requirements please do get in touch with our sales team who will be happy to help! Simply email sales@greyhoundchrom.com or call +44 (0) 151 649 4000

In addition to this, we also offer a wide range of certified and non-certified Reference Standards from the world’s leading manufacturers, all Guide 34 accredited.

Our Standards library includes standards that are no longer commercially available. We can provide neat products, mixtures, solutions and custom made standards made each to your individual specification.

ChemService is one of our top-selling suppliers for standards and custom mixtures;



Chem Service specialises in providing chemicals in small quantities. This allows you to order only what you need, when you need it.
Environmental Standards - Pesticides - Metabolites - EPA/CLP Test Mixtures - Phalates - PCB Compounds - Deuterated and C13 Standards - ASTM Methods - Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons - Food Analysis Standards - PCB/PBB Standards - High Purity Inorganic Standards - Customised Mixtures

High-Purity Standards Inc. have proudly served the scientific community for the past twenty years with high quality Spectrometric Standards and Reference Materials for AAS, ICP, ICP-MS, GC, GC-MS and IC, and has now expanded our stocked reference materials to include ISO Guide 34 multi-component organic Reference Materials.
Approximately one-half of High-Purity Standards business is in the preparation of custom blends and difficult to prepare special mixtures. In addition, High Purity have recently expanded their Organics lab. Their laboratories are now bigger and better to meet increased demand.
High Purity’s New products of note include expanded spiked filter products in addition to organic reference materials designed to meet EPA testing requirements and additional products from customer requests.
High Purity Standards are accredited to ISO standards: ISO 9001:2008, ISO/IEC 17025:2005 and ISO Guide 34:2009. We can supply copies of these certificates, they are available to download from our website.

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Monday, May 21, 2018

Chem Service Custom Synthesis | Greyhound Chromatography


ChemService

Certified Analytical Reference Standards and Chemicals in Small Quantities

Established in 1962, Chem Service is accredited to ISO Guide 34:2009, ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and registered and certified to the ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management System for the design, development, production, distribution, and servicing of organic neat and synthetic reference materials.

Chem Service, Inc. produces high purity standards for use as reference materials and for other laboratory purposes. More than 95% of their Standards Grade materials have a certified purity of 98.0% or greater and do not require purity corrections when preparing solutions for use with EPA, USTM, UST, and numerous other international methods.

Standards Grade chemicals are clearly labeled with an expiration date that is based on years of experience in handling and testing. Products are packaged in small quantities to minimize storage, waste, and disposal requirements. Organic and inorganic chemicals, solutions, and mixtures are available to meet a wide range of specialized laboratory needs.

                                    

Does your work require something made to your exact requirements?

ChemService synthesize many types of materials including: pesticides, metabolites, environmental standards, explosives, vitamins, and personal care products. Depending on the product, they can produce items from milligrams to kilograms.

Contact our friendly Sales Team on +44 (0) 151 649 4000 or sales@greyhoundchrom.com to arrange a quotation and prompt delivery via our extensive logistics network.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Sunday, May 15, 2016

How to Safely use Pesticides in the Garden | Greyhound Chromatography

Safet in the garden with pesticides


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Even in the colder months of the year, gardening can be a fun past time to get delicious fruits and vegetables or herbs and flowers. Regardless of what you are growing, it needs to be maintained. This can be difficult when you are battling pests who are ruining your crops. So what are gardeners to do? Use pesticides. However, these can be seriously dangerous to use if they are handled incorrectly. Consider these tips on how to safely use pesticides in your garden, indoors or out.

1. Don't use a homemade formula
Many gardeners who are against the idea of pesticides or looking to save a little money might try to make a homemade formula. Most of these mixes consist of detergent and water or some type of herbal remedy. While these formulas might be effective, they actually are illegal to use as a type of pesticide. This formula is unreliable as it is not a tested way to kill bugs and not kill your plants. You might find that your pests died, only to discover that your plants perished a few weeks later. Instead of going this route, research a few pesticides that are known to work well on the pests you are battling. That way, your plants will be safe and you will have effectively eliminated the problem.

2. Read the directions
Once you've found a pesticide formula you like, it's important to read the directions. While this might seem like a silly request, it's critical that you follow the instructions to a tee. Many people accidentally mix the wrong amounts of the solution, leading to a toxic chemical solution that can be extremely harmful to yourself or your family. If used safely, pesticides can be a great solution to eradicating your pest issues and keeping your plants safe. If the label comes with a warning, be sure to read it. Also, throw out old pesticides. Many homeowners will continue to use an old mix that they created months ago. However, this formula isn't effective and could be toxic and harmful to inhale.

3. Know when to call for help
Sometimes pest issues can be small and other times they can be completely out of hand. In cases where your pest problem is severe and seems to be everywhere, it's better to call in professional pest control people to manage the issue for you. They have the resources and experience necessary to get rid of the pests once and for all. Many homeowners may try a DIY option at first, hoping to save money. However, these solutions are ineffective when a pest control situation is clearly running rampant. Professional pest controllers have interacted with a variety of pests and can take them on at once to help save your garden.

4. Be mindful of your distribution process
Many people will purchase pesticides that come with a handheld sprayer or simply a dry formula that you can sprinkle around. While this might seem like a great idea, it's not. Handheld sprayers can be dangerous and harm you if you don't know what you are doing, and dry formulas tend to not be strong enough for most pests. Look into different distribution methods to see what people are using on their gardens for safekeeping. There are several great resources out there that have the information you need to make the right, smart decision.

5. Keep away pets and young family members
During your application process, make sure you warn others of what you are doing. You don't want young fingers touching certain plants or dogs licking the pesticides off of the plants. These chemicals are still very harmful and certainly can be problematic if they get in the eyes or mouth. Apply the chemicals on your own and ask that everyone stays away from the sprayed area until it's safe.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Monday, May 09, 2016

Endangered Species and Pesticides: What You Need to Know | Greyhound Chromatography


Endangered Species What you need to know | Greyhound Chromatography

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ENDANGERED SPECIES AND PESTICIDES: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

It's no surprise to anyone to hear that pesticides keep our crops safe and kill unwanted pests – but that knowledge becomes a little harder to bear when you find out that same chemical that is supposed to target bacteria carrying insects, is also hurting endangered species. The Guardian recently reported about 1,700 U.S. plants and animals – that's nearly all of them – are harmed by the two pesticides malathion and chlorpyrifos. Malathion is used to treat fruits and vegetables and it harms 97 percent of the endangered animals, explained the source. Chlorpyrifos on the other hand, is used to exterminate insects like termites, mosquitoes and roundworms, and puts 97 percent of plants in danger as well.

What is being done to address this issue?
In 1973 the U.S. passed the Endangered Species Act in order to protect all kinds of wildlife – everything from flora to fauna, explained the Center for Biological Diversity. One of the laws under this act controls the use of pesticides in the environment. However, many pesticides still went poorly regulated until this recent finding, explained environmental health director at the Center Lori Ann Burd.

"These dangerous pesticides have been used without proper analysis for decades, and now's the time to take this new information and create commonsense measures to protect plants, animals and people from these chemicals," Burd told the Guardian.

But environmental groups and farmers alike are urging the federal government to better explain the potential impacts of pesticides on both animals and humans. Burd therefore acknowledged that the evaluations of these pesticides is a good move for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency so they can better assess what further actions need to be taken.

Pest control protocol regarding endangered species.
Pesticides aren't going anywhere, however. They are an integral part to keeping citizens healthy from bacteria and viruses that could lead to serious widespread disease, so users need to be aware of the proper pesticide protocols when it comes to protecting endangered species. The most important things to know about using these chemicals are that the EPA has specific regulations per pesticide and geographic locations as the endangered species per area varies. So before you use them, you need to consult their website. There, you will find the correct way to apply the chemicals, as well as any limitations of said application.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Thursday, May 05, 2016

The Latest News on Fracking | Greyhound Chromatography


The latest news on fracking by ChemService

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Fracking continues to be a controversial subject not just in the U.S. but across the world.


Fire in Australia
Australian Parliament member Jeremy Buckingham recently took to the waters of the Condamine River to show that it wasn't just water. In an aluminum boat, Buckingham set out to record what would happen if he tried to light the so-called water on fire. But because the water was mixed with methane – a colorless and odorless gas – the rivers burst into flames, reported The Washington Post. The flames survived for about an hour which Buckingham used as a warning for the future of the country should fracking continue.

However, Buckingham admits that his evidence is not substantial and lacks concrete proof that the river's condition is a direct cause of fracking.

Rejection in the U.S.
Meanwhile, in the U.S., New York State turned down the Constitution Pipeline project that would allow gas to be fracked from Northeast Pennsylvania to travel to Boston, New York City and other regional markets. This is the third fracking project that has been rejected within the past year, reported CNN Money. Supporters of the Constitution Pipeline only see this as a setback however, and are determined to get to work on this project. On this side of the argument, they point out that this practice will create roughly 2,400 jobs and help lower the country's energy costs.

What you're left with
Fracking still has a long battle of research ahead of it. Pipeline companies and researchers have explained that they are working with the state to address water quality concerns – much like the ones being addressed in Australia – and even boast to put funds toward stream restoration, wetland migration and preservation of animal habitats. More concrete evidence needs to be researched in order to prove that fracking is harmful to water supply, and even more research needs to be devoted to safe fracking techniques.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Friday, February 19, 2016

Join us at Pittcon Conference & Expo 2016 with ChemService

Pittcon 2016

Paul Massie and The Greyhounds George and Gina
L-R: Gina the Greyhound, Paul Massie MD Greyhound Chromatography and George the Greyhound

We're absolutely delighted to once again be invited to exhibit at Pittcon, along with one of our Suppliers Chem Service.

Come and visit us on Stand #2518, we'll look forward to seeing you.

Register now for a meeting with us on your preferred date and we will confirm an allocated time slot as soon as possible.

Pittcon is one of the world’s largest annual premier conference and exposition on laboratory science. It is organised by The Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, a Pennsylvania not-for-profit educational corporation which is comprised of the Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh (SSP) and the Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh (SACP). The conference is held in a different USA state each year.

This year Pittcon is being held in Atlanta, Georgia USA.

Find out more about this event and register www.pittcon.org

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Tuesday, February 09, 2016

Why Combining Pesticides Takes Critical Focus | Greyhound Chromatography

Consider these tips on how yo safely use pesticides in your garden


Each day, thousands of people use pesticides on their lawns, their trees or even their farms. However, most people know the dangers associated with pesticides. These chemicals have been linked to human illness, water pollution and even death of animals. If pesticides are mishandled in any way, there could be serious consequences. That is why knowing how to mix the chemicals properly is so important.

The dangers of inaccurate mixing
If people do not add the right amount of water, there could be serious problems. Either the pesticide might not kill the pests or it might end up too powerful and kill unintended creatures. Whether people are mixing wet formulas or dry ones, precaution is needed during every step. However, if people use a pesticide applicator more than once, they may end up misplacing the directions or forgetting which portion of what goes into the mix, leaving a serious risk for danger. It is also important that people do not mix more than the applicator can handle and end up leaving it aside hoping to use it later. Certain concentrations are too strong to apply to small areas of land, such as a garden or a small patch of lawn. However, it can be difficult to gauge the level of potency with the amount of land people are working with.

Mixing chemicals and water correctly is even more important for farmers, who may not realize the number of people they are affecting with their crops. If a solution is mixed too strongly and then sprayed across a field, it could exceed the maximum tolerance for that crop. Tolerance levels are the highest level of chemicals a person can ingest without getting sick. Usually it is recommended that produce and other products are well below the tolerance level. According to the University of Kentucky, the levels of tolerance are set into place by the federal government. According to their website, "The Federal government sets residue tolerances for all pesticides used in the production of crop and animal products intended for food or feed, and for pesticides applied after harvest."

Hard to detect
It is impossible for pesticide applicators to detect the tolerance level for each crop, or determine the residue levels on each crop. Sometimes, residues are useful when farmers are looking to enjoy long-term pest control. However, it also can be difficult for people to understand tolerance levels. So what are people to do?

Luckily, there is an easy way for farmers and others to determine the correct measurements for pesticides so they do not misuse these chemicals. The solution is simply through a phone app. The new app, known as The DuPont TankMix Calculator Application allows a person to figure out the correct ratio of water to pesticide chemicals for what they are spraying. People can also determine how much they can spray by adding in the area size.

With products like these, mixing and using chemicals is becoming a lot easier and safer.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Tuesday, February 09, 2016

Report Finds That Pesticides aren't Linked to Cancer | Greyhound Chromatography

These days, pesticides have somewhat of a bad reputation. They are linked to killing bees, getting contaminating water supplies and making animals and people sick. However, they aren't connected to cancer, according to a study based on Price Edward Island.

The report showed that all pesticides used in PEI don't have any connection to four different types of cancer on the island. The report was released by the Department of Health and Wellness, according to The Guardian.

An interesting result

Naturally, like so many other regions of the country, there have been several arguments made against the pesticides used to grow crops in PEI. However, the report revealed that if the island chose to remove all of the pesticides farmers used, there still would be no effect on environment and subsequent dangers that came from it. For PEI, it seems as though the pesticides are not causing large-scale harm.

"Pesticides used in P.E.I. do not pose a significant public health risk when used according to Health Canada's usage and safety precaution labeling," noted the report that was posted on the department's website. "The Chief Public Health Office will continue to monitor ongoing research in this area."

Yet the lengthy report, that was about 300 pages in total, also did not completely rule out the dangers associated with pesticides. They noted that it may still be associated with health risks and even certain types of cancers, including bone marrow cancer and cancers in the blood. However, the island's pesticides seemed to have no effect on the four most common cancers found on PEI: lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer and prostate cancer.

However, the researchers noted that if other health risks were eliminated, like smoking for example, cancer rates would significantly drop. For instance, if smoking was banned on the island, the rates of lung cancer would drop by approximately 82 percent for males and 55 percent for females.

Other health conditions, including Parkinson's disease and types of skin cancer such as melanoma would be affected very little if agricultural pesticides were eliminated from farms and country sides.

Pesticides and PEI
This is not the first time pesticides have made headlines about health in PEI. Since pesticides were introduced to this small island off of Canada, several residents, visitors and even government officials have complained about the rise in popularity for using these dangerous chemicals. As a result of the uproar, several pesticides used to eliminate pests and weeds have been banned. Other pesticides used on farms, golf courses and even lawns have also come into question in recent years as residents and policymakers push to eliminate them and increase fines for their usage.

Out of all of the provinces in Canada, PEI has one of the most comprehensive laws regarding pesticide use, regulation and bans. Yet according to Environment Canada, there may be good reason for this legislation as PEI is the most intensively sprayed province in the country. In the past, activists have used data on cancer, the number of fish deaths and even negative press from other regions to push for legislation and harsher rules on pesticide use. However, the problem still remains and residents are still very concerned.

The main reason why PEI uses with so many pesticides is because of its agriculture industry. One of the most profitable crops for this small island is the potato. However, potatoes need protection from something known as a blight spores that grow on the leaves and cause the plant to rot. Farmers will coat the leaves in pesticides to help protect them. Potato fields are sprayed more than 20 times each summer, when the weather is hot and humid – and environment ideal for spore growth. The pesticides will get into the soil because of rain and into the air via wind, causing the pesticides to carry through the air and infiltrate local homes, neighborhoods and even schools and day cares.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Monday, December 14, 2015

Are Pesticides on Food Safe to Eat? | Greyhound Chromatography

Are Foods Containing Pesticides Safe to Eat?

Pesticides often get a bad reputation in the food industry. People are constantly complaining that food that is sprayed with pesticides is worse than food that isn't sprayed with these chemicals. According to a survey from Consumer Reports, approximately 85 percent of Americans are worried about pesticides on their produce. However, organic fruits and vegetables cost 49 percent more than regular produce on average. However, how do you know any type of food – organic or not – wasn't sprayed with pesticides? If it was, is it really that awful to eat?

A surprising discovery
Carl Winter, Ph.D., Director of the FoodSafe Program and Extension Food Toxicologist at the University of California-Davis, Best Food Facts stated that ingesting pesticides isn't that bad for you. He noted that most produce is sprayed with pesticides, and organic produce is no exception. Unlike regular pesticides, organic produce is only sprayed with EPA-approved pesticides, which usually are made out of natural products. Winter noted that while organic produce may have less chemicals on it overall, there can still be traces. Some studies have found that 30 percent of the studied organic produce had some level of detectable pesticides on them.

However, despite the presence of any type of pesticide, most fruits and vegetables people eat aren't harmful to them. The amount of pesticides on each individual piece of produce tends to be very minimal, causing little to no effect on humans.

"In the case of pesticide residues on food, we can detect them, but generally at very tiny levels," Winter told Best Food Facts. "I think consumers are concerned because they're aware that these chemicals, which have potential toxic effects, show up on foods. However, the levels at which we detect these pesticides are so low consumers have nothing to worry about."

Understanding variations
Yet the amount and type of pesticides on produce can vary, which can make all the difference in the long run. For instance, some is known for containing higher levels of pesticides than others. Strawberries, tangerines and hot peppers all contain high to extremely high levels of pesticides, according to Consumer Reports, which is why it might be wise to stick to organic versions of these types of produce. People can find out exactly which fruits and vegetables carry the most pesticides, and which ones carry the least through food guides online.

The average American has 29 different types of pesticides in their body at all times. However, the amount of these pesticides is so small that the human health isn't compromised by it. Winter recently performed a mass study to determine how harmful pesticides were on humans. He discovered that the amount of pesticides in the human body is 10,000 to 100,000 times lower than the pesticide levels found in laboratory animals. Winter noted these animals did not experience any harmful effects throughout their lifetime despite their pesticide levels, proving that the human intake may not be so bad after all.

If you are generally concerned about your intake, always wash your fruits and vegetables and check out an online guide that ranks produce with the highest levels of pesticides.

Monday, November 09, 2015

Beneficial Insects May Help Boost Pesticide’s Reputation | Greyhound Chromatography Certified Reference Standards

Pesticides don't have a great reputation

These days, it's pretty clear that pesticides have a not-so-great reputation. However, some insects may be able to turn things around.

Some insects, such as the ladybug, can only be beneficial to the environment, meaning they work toward the greater good of saving the crops. Other insects, such as sugarcane aphids, tend to have the opposite effect – they're just looking for a good lunch. Luckily, when these two insects go toe-to-toe, the ladybug tends to prevail, leaving crops untouched and aphids gone. However, there's sadly not enough lady bugs in the world to help protect the sorghum plant, which is why pesticides are needed too.

Together, pesticides and ladybugs may be able to protect crops without causing harm to the environment, or to humans. Pesticides are often criticized for making farmers and consumers ill, as well as causing other latent health issues. However, this usually occurs because of the amount of pesticides going on the crops. Many studies have found that pesticide companies tend to spray a serious amount of the product on plants, even though only a small amount is needed to fight off pests like the hungry aphid. If pesticide companies began reducing their amount of spray, they may help out their current dismal reputation.

Working hand in hand
Luckily, farmers in Lubbock, Texas, have already figured out the benefits of moderation, with a little help from their ladybug friends. The farmers in Southern Texas know how quickly aphids can populate, and how easily they can jump from crop to crop. For example, this past summer aphids moved from sorghum to sugarcane, wreaking havoc on several acres of land in the area and ruining sales for those farmers. The farmers realized that when aphids reach those high numbers, ladybugs alone cannot control the population. Instead, that's where pesticides come in to significantly reduce the number of this voracious pest. Once the population has been considerably cut down, the ladybugs will come and take care of the rest, leaving crops relatively free of aphids and healthy enough to continue growing without excessive pesticides.

For some areas, ladybugs aren't the only insect chipping in. Other bugs, such as parasitic wasps and green lacewings can help fight against hungry aphids. Yet the role of pesticides should not be discounted.

"Once initial sugarcane aphid numbers were knocked back to where ladybugs and the like could keep up with the sugarcane aphid, beneficials were very effective. However, all scenarios could be seen from where beneficials cleaned up some sugarcane aphid populations, to where others had little chance or had no impact at all," integrated pest management agent Kerry Siders noted to news source Amarillo.com.

However, it's important that farmers are mindful of the pesticides they're spraying around their farms. If they spray too much, or the chemical is too strong, they may wipe out all the insects in the area, good and bad.

Many farmers swear by Transform, an insecticide that was released in 2013 to kill pests associated with crops such as potatoes, soybeans, cotton and canola. In 2015, after the significant outbreak of aphids on sugarcane crops, the Environmental Protection Agency approved use of the product in Alabama, Georgia, Arkansas and Texas.

Friday, November 06, 2015

Special Offer | Surplus Stock | Greyhound Chromatography





ChemService and Agilent Technologies Surplus Stock

We currently have a number of products by ChemService and Agilent Technologies all at reduced prices.  

See the current up to date list of surplus products in our online store 

Contact our sales team onsales@greyhoundchrom.com or +44 (0) 151 649 4000 for special pricing of these items.

Shop online now

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Catapillar Poop May Be A Safe Pesticide | Greyhound Chromatography Analytical Reference Standards

Catapillar poop may be a safe pesticide
Chem Service



Caterpillar frass, better known as caterpillar poop, may be the latest organic pesticide on the block to help defend fungi and pathogens from attacking plants.

Researchers from Penn State University discovered this interesting result when they realized a specific type of caterpillar was able to eat corn and get past the plant's attempts at defense, according to FoodWorldNews.

On the defense
Corn naturally recognizes when it is being eaten by an herbivore or by various types of fungi. Once the plant understands this, it will take proactive measures to fight the fungus or herbivore off. For example, if a caterpillar is munching on the plant, corn will create and release a chemical that makes the plant taste bad. When it is being attacked by specific pathogens and fungi, corn will release an enzyme that inhibits the fungus or pathogen from growing.

However, a specific type of caterpillar, known as armyworms, are able to get around the plant's defenses. Specifically, when the corn begins to defend against the hungry caterpillar, it will release frass that causes the plant to believe it is being attacked by a fungus, not a caterpillar. As a result, the plant will focus mainly on defending itself from pathogens, allowing the caterpillar to munch happily without resistance.

Now, researchers are hoping to use this clever mechanism to their advantage. Yet the study authors do not know what is in the feces that makes corn so confused. They will test various components of their findings against one another to determine exactly what compounds trigger this reaction.

Finding a solution
Hopefully, the subsequent findings will lead to new discoveries on how corn defends itself and what might prepare it better. The scientists believe that this type of frass may be able to cause specific plants to up their defenses against various pathogens. Of course, the frass could be used for plants that are not attacked by herbivores but strictly types of fungi.

Not all fungi is harmful to plants and crops. However, pathogenic fungi can be detrimental to crops, slowly killing them off. This type of fungi will steal a plant's food while it is living, or attempt to kill the plant and then take its food afterward, according to Mycolog.com. The fungus will infiltrate the crop's breathing holes, or it will insert a hole into the center of the stem. Once the fungus has gotten inside, it will poison the plant and eat the food, or take nutrients from plant cells. Sometimes these attacks can make plants very sick and cause them to wilt, and other times it can wipe out entire crop sets. Hopefully caterpillar frass will be able to change all that.

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Monday, October 19, 2015

'Apply Responsibly' Promotes Safe Pesticides Use | Greyhound Chromatography Analytical Reference Standards

APPLY RESPONSIBLY’ PROMOTES SAFE PESTICIDE USE

Chem Service

These days, pesticides seem to be taking a lot of heat. From complaints that they are killing off bee and butterfly populations to arguments that they could be linked to cancer development, pesticides have gotten a bad rap as of late. Luckily, one group may be looking to turn that around.

A California-based group has started a campaign known as "Apply Responsibly," which is encouraging gardeners to pick up those bottles of pesticides again. Their argument? Pesticides are only harmful when they are used incorrectly.

Changing reputations
The campaign was founded by The Pyrethroid Working Group, an organization that supports the pesticide industry. According to the foundation's website, the group decided that oftentimes people are misinformed about pesticide use because of the bad reputation they have earned in the media. The organization only supports pesticides that are federally approved for use, but notes that with the right methods, gardeners and farmers can repel pests safely without harming themselves in the meantime.

Mainly the campaign supports the use of pyrethroid pesticides, a type of insecticide used to kill voracious pests in small gardens and farms. Usually this man-made chemical is not harmful to people and other types of mammals. However, it can be toxic to fish if it accidentally seeps into a nearby body of water. The chemical is also very potent against the insects it is supposed to kill – only a small dose will effectively do the job, according to Texas A&M University.

The organization offers tips for proper, safe use of the pesticide on its website, as well as lots of information about its history and development over the years. The chemical also comes in many different forms and some may be harder to recognize than others. Ashley Clark, a spokesperson for Apply Responsibly, told the Compton Herald that it is important for consumers to read the label first before using the product. If people do not understand what they are using, there is a greater chance that people will mess up and use the product incorrectly.

"This will [direct] them to use the right amount because each product is different," she told the news publication.

Following directions
Once people have read the label and understand the directions, the recommendations do not end there. People should also be mindful of their water usage after applying pesticides, as overwatering can cause runoff. Consumers should also be mindful that their application is far from decks, sidewalks, walkways and driveways, as pets and children may walk on these areas barefoot. Lastly, people should only buy enough pesticides for the job at hand or for the season. If people attempt to reuse pesticides the following season, the chemical compounds could have changed and they might have put themselves in a compromised position.

Without these safety measures, people could be at risk for poisoning themselves. Many states do not keep track of the rates of pesticide poisonings, but California does. According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, California had more than 7,600 pesticide poisonings in 2008. Approximately 78 million households use pesticides in their gardens or around their yards, so organizations such as The Pyrethroid Working Group should continue to educate the general public on their pesticide use.

Greyhound Chromatography is pleased to supply Chem Service Certified Reference Standards to Research and Analysis laboratories worldwide.

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Thursday, April 02, 2015

Watch: Pittcon 2015 with LabTube

We were kindly invited to exhibit at this years' Pittcon alongside one of our long standing suppliers ChemService. This year Pittcon was held in New Orleans, and what a busy show it was! It was great to catch up with our customers and suppliers State side, and meet new contacts.

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LabTube kindly caught up with us at the show, and invited us along to shoot some short videos;

LabTube Meets Paul Massie, MD Greyhound Chromatography, at Pittcon 2015, New Orleans. In this video, Paul introduces Greyhound Chromatography and the range of products we provide..

In this video LabTube meets Sue Massie, Head of Marketing at Greyhound Chromatography, and George and Gina the Greyhounds.

Sue Massie, Head of Marketing at Pittcon 2015

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Thursday, April 02, 2015

Researchers Develop Global Warming Resistant Beans | Greyhound Chromatography Certified Reference Standards

Researchers Develop Global Warming Resistant Beans
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Amidst fears that rising global temperatures would limit farmers' ability to grow beans in areas where these protein-rich foods are critical staples for the population, including many areas of Latin America and Africa, researchers have discovered new varieties of the legume that can survive in high heat environments.

New breeds of heat-resistant beans created

If global warming occurs at predicted rates, by 2050 the space that can grow current varieties of beans would decrease by half, according to CGIAR. To prepare for this temperature shift, CGIAR lead a team of researchers who set up experiments in Colombia. Both outdoors and in greenhouses, the scientists tested different varieties of beans at temperatures well above what is normal for bean growing at night.

They found 30 heat-tolerant varieties that can be grown in the worst-case scenario predicted temperatures. These beans can be grown at about 72 degrees, which is higher than the typical safe temperatures of 64 and 66.

About 400 million people rely on beans as a major food source that's rich in protein, fiber and other critical nutrients. These new beans make it possible for people to continue eating these beans for the future. CGIAR made these new varieties by combining popular modern bean varieties that you'd see in a grocery store, like pinto, black or kidney beans with the tepary bean, which is a bean that's good at surviving and has been grown in and around Mexico since before Columbus.

"Incredibly, the heat-tolerant beans we tested may be able to handle a worst-case scenario where the build-up of greenhouse gases causes the world to heat up by an average of 4 degrees Celsius (about 7.2 degrees Fahrenheit)," Steve Beebe, a senior CGIAR bean researcher, explained at a recent development conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. "Even if they can only handle a 3 degree rise, that would still limit the bean production area lost to climate change to about five percent. And farmers could potentially make up for that by using these beans to expand their production of the crop in countries like Nicaragua and Malawi, where beans are essential to survival."

About two dozen countries contributed funding to the project, including the U.S., the U.K. and many other developed nations, as well as several organizations including the World bank, the International Development Research Centre, International Fund for Agricultural Development and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Managing bean pests

While heat-tolerant beans may not seem necessary yet, the researchers suggest that Latin American countries should consider using these hybrids now. The tests showed that higher heat is already affecting these crops.

In addition to heat, bean farmers have to contend with many of the other pest animals, insects, fungi and plants that can affect bean production. North Carolina State University outlined just a few of the pests that can impact bean farmers in the U.S.

Aphids are dangerous to bean plants because they feed on the sap. This leads to discoloration and damage to the crop, although it may not directly kill the plant. In addition to bean aphids, cowpea, melon and potato aphids can also damage bean plants.

Other sap-sucking insects that can discolor and deform bean plants in the U.S. include corn earworm, stink bugs, corn borers, vine borers, seedcorn maggots and cornstalk borers.

Aside from sap-sucking bugs, bean plants can be damage by insects that mine the plant or eat the leaves. The bean leaf beetle, Mexican bean beetle and the vegetable leafminer are among the most dangerous insects for bean plants.

Clemson University pointed to some of the best pesticides for protecting beans. Bifenthrin, malathion, carbaryl and cyhalothrin are among the most effective chemical pesticides for preventing or treating infestations of aphids, leaf beetles, earworms, mites, grasshoppers and many other insects.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.


Greyhound Chromatography is pleased to supply Chem Service Certified Reference Standards to Research and Analysis laboratories worldwide.


The benefits of using Chem Service Certified Reference Standards:

  • High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials
  • Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses
  • Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)
  • Certification backed with experience: 50 years of experience.
  • ISO 9001:2008: ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :

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Monday, March 30, 2015

The Chemistry That Keeps Your Pistons Pumping | Greyhound Chromatography Certified Reference Standards

The Chemistry That Keeps Your Pistons Pumping

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As of 2014, there are about 250 million cars and trucks in the U.S., according to the Los Angeles Times. Each one of these millions of vehicles has an engine that contains pistons pumping thousands of times each minute. To keep each of these cars moving, those pistons pumping and millions of people getting where they need to go, the engine needs to be lubricated and protected from wear and tear.

In the 1940s, oil engineers accidently discovered zinc dialkyldithiophosphate or ZDDP. When added to motor oil, it adheres to the surrounding surfaces, protecting them from rust and other normal wear. However, the chemistry behind why ZDDP turns into the tribofilm that coats these engine surfaces has long been kept unknown, until now.

ZDDP in the right environment
Scientists from ExxonMobil and the University of Pennsylvania came together to research the chemistry and physics behind popular oil additives. They published their results in the journal Science.

"ZDDP has been used for more than 70 years," said Nitya Gosvami a research project manager in mechanical engineering department head Robert Carpick's in a statement. "It's one of the most successful antiwear additives we have, but we still don't understand how it works. We do know that everything that happens during sliding is occurring on the first few atomic layers of the surfaces, so we have to use the knowledge we have from nanotechnology and apply it to understand what's going on there."

Aside from knowledge, the scientists wanted to learn more about how ZDDP worked in order to make engines and oils more effective and efficient, getting rid of minor flaws, such as ZDDP's increase of friction in the engine.

The researchers discovered that ZDDP is a smart material that forms under stress or pressure. It's smart because it stops itself from growing larger than the space allows. The pistons create the perfect environment for the film to develop because the pressure changes the amount of energy needed for a chemical reaction to occur, Carpick explained in the statement.

The researchers credited tribochemistry and the nanoscale research approach for finding the answers about how the film forms and why ZDDP has been so effective.

"Nanotechnology's not just for doing cool science," Gosvami said. "You can bring your industrial products into the lab and we can do research on them in a big way. We can get a better understanding of them on the molecular scale."

The chemistry of motor oil
The researchers explained in their paper that they hope to build off this finding and continue the work to develop smarter oils for cars. Currently motor oil is made with a number of naturally occurring and added chemical components.

As Bob Is The Oil Guy explained, oil is made with a slew of chemicals that fit into a short list of chemical categories. For example, organomatalics are used as detergents to neutralize acids that are created through normal engine combustion. Similarly, dispersants are a category of chemicals that help clean out the solid parts of waste from combustion. Esters and partial esters are used to aid lubrication as well as seal conditioners.

Many chemical additives are designed to stop reaction from occurring. Silicone products help prevent foam buildup, while pour point depressants and corrosion inhibitors help stop rust, wear and wax crystals.

There are also huge polymeric molecules that form Viscosity Index Improvers or VII to control the rate at which organic fluids thin when heated, Bob Is The Oil Guy explained.

The types of chemicals used depend on brand, price and purpose among other factors. There are also synthetic motor oils that mimic the affects of organic motor oil and last much longer.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

Greyhound Chromatography is pleased to supply Chem Service Certified Reference Standards to Research and Analysis laboratories worldwide.

The benefits of using Chem Service Certified Reference Standards:

  • High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials
  • Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses
  • Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)
  • Certification backed with experience: 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :
  • ISO Guide 34:2009: For Organic Reference Material


Contact Us!

Tel:                      +44 (0)151 649 4000
Web:                   www.greyhoundchrom.com
Email:                 info@greyhoundchrom.com


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Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Biodegradable Plastic Not As Degradable As Advertised


Biodegradable Plastic Not as Degradable as Advertised

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Plastic has come to replace metal, glass and many other materials in a variety of industries and for many purpose from storing fuel to wrapping leftover food. However, one problem with the emergence of prevalent plastic bottles, containers and materials is that they don't breakdown the same way as other material in landfills.

To combat this growing pollution issue, engineers developed plastic that can biodegrade. However, the plastic that has all the convenience and versatility of traditional plastic but none of the environmental impact may actually be too good to be true. According to a new study from Michigan State University scientists, plastics that are engineered to degrade don't breakdown as expected.

Degradable plastic doesn't breakdown

Published in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology, a study on degradable plastics found that they broke down at roughly the same rate as more traditional plastic – not faster.

Researchers simulated landfill conditions by increasing UV levels and manipulating gases to test the plastics, because that's where the majority of plastic products end up. However, under simulated conditions or when simply buried under soil for three years, products containing the additives said to aid the plastic's breakdown showed no difference in how the product degraded, even when examined on a molecular level.

"In this study, we evaluated the effect of biodegradation-promoting additives on the biodegradation of polyethylene and polyethylene terephthalate," the study authors explained. "Biodegradation was evaluated in compost, anaerobic digestion, and soil burial environments. None of the five different additives tested significantly increased biodegradation in any of these environments. Thus, no evidence was found that these additives promote and/or enhance biodegradation of PE or PET polymers."

How are degradable plastics supposed to work?

Although researchers haven't found biodegradable plastic to be as effective as promised, the theory behind adding chemicals to plastic to allow it breakdown is sound.

EPI Environmental Technologies Inc., which develop oxo-biodegradable technology for plastic manufacturing explained the science behind prodegradant additives. When normal plastic breaks down it requires oxygen to have a reaction with large polymer molecules of plastic made of carbon and hydrogen.

This reaction will occur naturally with plastic left in the environment, EPI explained, but it can take an extremely long time, thus leading to pollution. Instead, products like those that EPI make are designed to catalyze and accelerate the reaction. EPI advertised a rate 100 to 1,000 times faster than the natural breakdown of traditional plastic.

Biodegradable plastics are supposed to breakdown into nothing more than water, carbon dioxide and biomass in a short time.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Friday, March 13, 2015

Chocolate in Danger Due to Demand, Pests | Greyhound Chromatography Certified Reference Standards

Chocolate in Danger Due to Demand, Pests




Almost everybody loves chocolate, but that may be a problem. As this candy become increasingly popular around the world, in growing economies such as India and China, a supply shortage may be around the corner.

Chocolate relies on cocoa or cacao for its trademark flavor. But unlike candy made from sugar cane or corn syrup, cacao can't be grown rapidly enough to keep up with increasing demand. According to NPR's Planet Money, the plant only grows in a specific tropical setting, it takes up to 10 years to mature and nearly 80 percent of the yield is lost to fungi or diseases.

Finding a sweet solution

Scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Mars, Inc., which makes Snickers, M&M's and Twix, are working on developing a super breed of the cocoa plant to resist these common diseases and fungi to help boost crop yield. Not only would this be able to help meet demand, but it could keep many farmers in business, which Juan Carlos Motomayo, the lead scientist at Mars, told Planet Money was the priority.

Motomayor described the way that cacao is grown today as being "prehistoric." There haven't been the advances in technology and pesticide sciences as there have been with corn, wheat or other large scale agriculture.

But scientists are working to create a form of cacao that is tough enough to survive pest diseases and possibly even produce chocolate more quickly. Despite thinking of corn as a rough model for how to grow chocolate more widely, Motomayor told Planet money that he doesn't expect the cacao crop diversity to disappear as the super breed is invented.

Fungi and diseases

It will be years before a superbreed of chocolate is invented, so in the mean time the best defense is to use pesticides against these diseases and fungi. The most common cacao pests are frosty pod, black pod, vascular-streak dieback and witches broom.

The International Cocoa Organization pointed to the damage that these pests can do and which pesticides are most effective against them.

Black pod - Also known as phytophthora pod rot, black pod can decrease a crop yield by a quarter and even kills trees about 10 percent of the time. It's an aggressive pathogen that's common in Africa and South American, which rots and shrivels the pods and seeds of cacao. The ICCO recommended copper-based fungicides mixed with metalaxyl to take down this pest.

Witches Broom - This disease is caused by the Moniliophthora perniciosafungus and is common through Central and South America as well as the Caribbean. It can seriously affect production, stopping the tree from ever even developing fruit. There is no go-to fungicide to stop the development of Witches Broom, the ICCO explained. Instead, areas turn to different combinations of chemicals. Removing infected parts and using disease resistant plants are the best defenses, but those aren't always effective.

Frosty pod rot - This common cacao condition is caused by Moniliophthora roreri, which is similar to a fungus. It strikes against cocoa pods only while they're growing and is wide spread in Latin America. The ICCO recommended using Flutolanil as a systematic pesticide, explaining copper-based and organic defensive pesticides are also successful.

Vascular-streak dieback – This Southeast Asian and South Pacific cocoa disease is fungus-caused and often leads to the death of a tree. Malaysia has been especially hard hit by this disease, the ICCO explained, because it can hurt an entire plantation. This disease develops during the region's wet season, making chemical protection difficult. Instead, the ICCO suggested propiconazole be used on the stems of seedlings during development.

There are also insects that can affect cocoa production, including the cocoa pod borer and mirids.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Friday, March 13, 2015

What is a Molluscicide? | Greyhound Chromatography Certified Reference Standards

What is a molluscicide?



A pesticide is an all encompassing term for a chemical or substance that kills unwanted animals, insects, plants or other organisms. It's usually used in relation to large-scale agriculture, but sometimes used for domestic or commercial purposes. While herbicides and insecticides often dominate the conversation around pesticides, there are actually many other targeted pesticide types, such as nematicides, rodenticides, avicides and molluscicides.

Each of these terms refers to a pesticide targeted to specific animal or group of animals. Molluscicides are designed to kill mollusks, specifically snails and slugs in agricultural circumstances. Although this may be a slightly overlooked type of pesticide, it's critical to many large- and small-scale gardeners and farmers. Learn more about how molluscicides work, what they target and which chemicals are most effective.

Understand molluscicides

Molluscicides are pesticides which kill mollusks, an animal phylum of tens of thousands of invertebrate creatures. Mollusks include octopi and squid, as well as snails and slugs, which are usually targeted by molluscicides.

Slugs and snails are well-known by farmers and gardeners as some of the most annoying and destructive pests. They can destroy the leaves and fruit of a large variety of plants, old and young, according to the University of California Integrated Pest Management Program.

"Snails and slugs feed on a variety of living plants and on decaying plant matter," UC IPM explained. "They chew irregular holes with smooth edges in leaves and flowers and can clip succulent plant parts. They also can chew fruit and young plant bark. Because they prefer succulent foliage or flowers, they primarily are pests of seedlings and herbaceous plants, but they also are serious pests of ripening fruits that are close to the ground such as strawberries, artichokes, and tomatoes. They also will feed on foliage and fruit of some trees; citrus are especially susceptible to damage."

Luckily, these pests are easily noticeable by the silvery trails of dried mucus left behind by their foot. When farmers and gardeners spot the telltale signs and damage left behind by snails and slugs, it's time to look to molluscicides for help.

As the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers explained, various types of molluscicides typically have similar modes of action. Molluscicides, sometimes referred to as bait, are touched or ingested by the slug or snail, then the chemicals manipulate the water balance of the animal. By affecting the amount of water in the mollusk's body, the molluscicides put the slugs or snails on the path to organ failure and inhibit healthy body functions.

There are two forms of chemical molluscicides: oxidizing and non-oxidizing. The non-oxidizing are among the most popular because they're more cost efficient. Although expensive in small quantities, non-oxidizing molluscicides are more effective in these small doses.

The Army Corps of Engineers outlined some of the most common non-oxidizing molluscicides including:

Quanternary and polyquaternary ammonium compounds
Aromatic hydrocarbons
Endothall as the mono salt
Metals like copper sulfate and their salts
Niclosamide.

Oxidizing compounds that can be used to combat snail and slug infestations include chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramines, ozone, bromine, hydrogen peroxide and potassium permanganate, according to the Army Core Engineers.

One of the most commonly used chemicals in molluscicides is metaldehyde. Used in Antimillace, Ariotox, Deadline, Halizan, Limatox, Namekil and Slug-Tox, this chemical has been popular since the late 1960s for attracting and killing slugs and snails.

Other uses for molluscicides
Aside from slugs and snails in the garden or on a farm, mollusks can also harm commercial and industrial business in bodies of water, Marrone Bio innovations explained. Mollusks can clog pipes, damage equipment and costs businesses significant amounts of money in lost efficiency.

Often people turn to molluscicides to get rid of these pests and keep business profitable. However, there are a variety of environmental factors to consider to avoid wide-spread pollution in the waterway.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Monday, October 20, 2014

MSDS Available in Multiple Languages

 Material Safety Data Sheets

Material Safety Data Sheets or MSDS as they are more commonly known, are internationally required to provide safety instructions for handling individual products.

These are now becoming more available from a number of suppliers in multi-lingual formats.

If you require an MSDS in a language other than English and do not see it on the website, please email us at info@greyhoundchrom.com and we will provide a translated copy as soon as possible.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

Tel:    +44 (0)151 649 4000
Web:  www.greyhoundchrom.com 

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