Thursday, May 31, 2018

Phthalates are Linked to Incidence of Childhood Asthma | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Phthalates are Linked to Incidence of Childhood Asthma


The number of children diagnosed with asthma continues to rise in the United States and scientists are exploring the links between the chronic respiratory disease and chemical compounds found in air pollution, tobacco smoke and other sources. One team of scientists from the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health investigated the effects of prenatal exposure to two phthalates – butylbenzyl phthalate and di-n-butyl phthalate – as published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. They discovered these chemicals increased the overall risk of childhood asthma by more than 70 percent.

The results of this study may have an impact on public health efforts to control the incidence of childhood asthma.

'We have to protect pregnant women'
According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, the number of children ages 5 to 14 years diagnosed with asthma in the U.S. nearly doubled between 1980 and 1993. That figure continued to rise over the next two decades. As of 2011, more than 7 million American children younger than 18 years had asthma. During that same year, more than 4 million of these individuals experienced at least one asthma attack. This condition can make it difficult for children to engage in everyday activities, and in some cases may even prove fatal.

The authors of the new study had previously studied the impact of prenatal exposure to various chemical compounds on the incidence of childhood asthma. For the current research, they decided to focus on BBzP and DnBP. In an experiment, they followed 300 pregnant women and measured metabolism of four phthalates by analyzing urine samples. Urine was collected from the mothers in the third trimester of pregnancy, as well as from the children at ages 3, 5 and 7 years. The researchers then compared the incidence of asthma in the upper one-third of subjects based on phthalate exposure to that of the bottom one-third.

Results showed that BBzP raised the risk of childhood asthma by 72 percent between the top and bottom thirds of the study subjects. For DnBP, that risk increase was 78 percent.

"The fetus is extremely vulnerable during pregnancy. While it is incumbent on mothers to do everything they can to protect their child, they are virtually helpless when it comes to phthalates like BBzP and DnBP that are unavoidable. If we want to protect children, we have to protect pregnant women," said senior study author Rachel Miller, M.D.

The researchers were unable to discern the most prominent sources of phthalate exposure among the study subjects, but these compounds are found in a range of products, including plastic food containers, vinyl flooring, insect repellent, automobile steering wheels and dashboards, and shower curtains. While the scientists are not entirely clear on how phthalates can drive childhood asthma, they proposed that these chemical compounds may cause inflammation and oxidative stress in developing fetuses.

Previously, phthalates had been banned from various childhood products. No such measures have been taken for pregnant mothers.

Phthalates are a group of compounds that are primarily used as vinyl softeners. They provide flexibility and durability to plastics that are
used in many industrial and consumer products, including children’s toys, food packaging, medical devices, building materials and
personal care items.


Due to the high potential for exposure, these products are being monitored to determine the risk to humans and the environment.
Phthalates are classified as endocrine disruptors because of their ability to interfere with the body’s endocrine system and, possibly,
causing birth defects, developmental defects, and cancer.

Phthalate Standards available from Chem Service Inc
Chem Service offers an extensive line of phthalate standards and it is growing. If you do not see the compound you need, please contact
us and we may be able to produce it.

  • N-11179-10G Benzyl 2-ethylhexyl phthalate 10gm

    • NG-11186-10G Benzyl isohexyl phthalate 10gm
    • N-11216-10G Bis(2-ethoxyethyl)phthalate 605-54-9 10gm
    • N-11216-500MG Bis(2-ethoxyethyl)phthalate 605-54-9 500mg
    • N-11216-5G Bis(2-ethoxyethyl)phthalate 605-54-9 5gm
    • S-11216J4-1ML Bis(2-ethoxyethyl)phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11216J4-5ML Bis(2-ethoxyethyl)phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-11223-10G Bis(2-ethylhexyl)hexahydro phthalate 10gm
    • N-11224-10G Bis(2-ethylhexyl)isophthalate 137-89-3 10gm
    • N-11226-10G Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 117-81-7 10gm
    • N-11226-1G Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 117-81-7 1gm
    • N-11226-5G Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 117-81-7 5gm
    • S-11226J1-1ML Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11226J1-5ML Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-11304-10G Bis(2-methoxyethyl)phthalate 117-82-8 10gm
    • S-11304A5-1ML Bis(2-methoxyethyl)phthalate Solution 2000ug/ml in Acetonitrile 1mL
    • S-11304A5-5ML Bis(2-methoxyethyl)phthalate Solution 2000ug/ml in Acetonitrile 5mL
    • S-11304J4-1ML Bis(2-methoxyethyl)phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11304J4-5ML Bis(2-methoxyethyl)phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-11305-1G Bis(2-n-butoxyethyl)phthalate 117-83-9 1gm
    • N-11305-5G Bis(2-n-butoxyethyl)phthalate 117-83-9 5gm
    • S-11305J4-1ML Bis(2-n-butoxyethyl)phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11305J4-5ML Bis(2-n-butoxyethyl)phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-11309-10G Bis(4-methyl-2-pentyl)phthalate 146-50-9 10gm
    • N-11309-5G Bis(4-methyl-2-pentyl)phthalate 146-50-9 5gm
    • S-11309J4-1ML Bis(4-methyl-2-pentyl)phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11309J4-5ML Bis(4-methyl-2-pentyl)phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-11304-500MG Bis(methoxyethyl)phthalate 117-82-8 500mg
    • N-11320-10G Bis[2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethyl]phthalate 117-85-1 10gm
    • N-11356-10G Butyl 2-ethylhexyl phthalate 85-69-8 10gm
    • N-11360-1G Butyl benzyl phthalate 85-68-7 1gm
    • N-11360-5G Butyl benzyl phthalate 85-68-7 5gm

    • S-11360J1-1ML Butyl benzyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11360J1-5ML Butyl benzyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-11364-10G Butyl cyclohexyl phthalate 84-64-0 10gm
    • N-11382-10G Butyl decyl phthalate 89-19-0 10gm
    • N-11368-10G Butyl isodecyl phthalate 10gm
    • N-11374-10G Butyl octyl phthalate 84-78-6 10gm
    • NG-N70-1G Decamethylene diammonium terephthalate 1gm
    • N-11310-1G Di(methylcyclohexyl)phthalate 1gm
    • NG-11614-10G Dialkyl phthalate linear C7-C9-Cll 10gm
    • N-11617-10G Diallyl phthalate 131-17-9 10gm
    • NG-15921-2.5G Diallyl terephthalate 2.5gm
    • N-11620-500MG Diamyl phthalate 131-18-0 500mg
    • N-11620-5G Diamyl phthalate 131-18-0 5gm
    • S-11620B7-1ML Diamyl phthalate Solution 5000ug/ml in Acetone 1mL
    • S-11620B7-5ML Diamyl phthalate Solution 5000ug/ml in Acetone 5mL
    • N-11626-1G Dibenzyl phthalate 523-31-9 1gm
    • S-11626J1-1ML Dibenzyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11626J1-5ML Dibenzyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-11589-1G Dibutyl phthalate 84-74-2 1gm
    • N-11684-10G Dicyclohexyl phthalate 84-61-7 10gm
    • N-11684-5G Dicyclohexyl phthalate 84-61-7 5gm
    • S-11684X5-1ML Dicyclohexyl phthalate Solution 2000ug/ml in Methylene chloride 1mL
    • S-11684X5-5ML Dicyclohexyl phthalate Solution 2000ug/ml in Methylene chloride 5mL
    • N-11704-10G Diethyl phthalate 84-66-2 10gm
    • N-11704-1G Diethyl phthalate 84-66-2 1gm
    • S-11704J1-1ML Diethyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11704J1-5ML Diethyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-11710-1G Diethyl terephthalate 636-09-9 1gm
    • N-13834-1G Diheptyl phthalate (Mixture of branched chain isomers) 41451-28-9 1gm
    • N-13811-10G Diisoamyl phthalate 605-50-5 10gm
    • N-11728-5G Diisobutyl phthalate 84-69-5 5gm
    • S-11728B6-1ML Diisobutyl phthalate Solution 2500ug/ml in Acetone 1mL
    • S-11728B6-5ML Diisobutyl phthalate Solution 2500ug/ml in Acetone 5mL
    • N-11734-10G Diisodecyl phthalate 26761-40-0 10gm
    • N-11735-10G Diisohexyl phthalate 10gm
    • N-11737-1G Diisononyl phthalate 68515-48-0 1gm
    • NG-11742-10G Diisooctyl isophthalate 10gm
    • NG-11743-10G Diisooctyl phthalate 10gm
    • NG-11749-10G Diisotridecyl phthalate 27253-26-5 10gm
    • N-11765-10G Dimethyl iso-phthalate 1459-93-4 10gm
    • N-11765-5G Dimethyl iso-phthalate 1459-93-4 5gm
    • N-11770-10G Dimethyl phthalate 131-11-3 10gm
    • N-11770-1G Dimethyl phthalate 131-11-3 1gm
    • S-11770H1-1ML Dimethyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Ethyl acetate 1mL
    • S-11770H1-5ML Dimethyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Ethyl acetate 5mL
    • S-11770M1-1ML Dimethyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Methanol 1mL
    • S-11770M1-5ML Dimethyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Methanol 5mL
    • N-11773-10G Dimethyl terephthalate 120-61-6 10gm
    • N-11773-5G Dimethyl terephthalate 120-61-6 5gm
    • NG-16328-5G Dimethyl-4-hydroxy isophthalate 5985-24-0 5gm
    • NG-16347-5G Dimethyl-5-nitroisophthalate 13290-96-5 5gm

    • NG-16425-10G Dimethyl-5-sulfoisophthalate, sodium salt 3965-55-7 10gm
    • N-11589-10G Di-n-butyl phthalate 84-74-2 10gm
    • S-11589J1-1ML Di-n-butyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11589J1-5ML Di-n-butyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • S-11589A1-1ML Di-n-butylphthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Acetonitrile 1mL
    • NG-11592-10G Di-n-decyl phthalate 84-77-5 10gm
    • N-11596-10G Di-n-hexyl phthalate 84-75-3 10gm
    • N-11596-5G Di-n-hexyl phthalate 84-75-3 5gm
    • S-11596J4-1ML Di-n-hexyl phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11596J4-5ML Di-n-hexyl phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-11600-10G Di-n-octyl isophthalate 4654-18-6 10gm
    • N-11601-10G Di-n-octyl phthalate 117-84-0 10gm
    • N-11601-5G Di-n-octyl phthalate 117-84-0 5gm
    • S-11601J1-1ML Di-n-octyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • N-11601-1G Di-n-octylphthalate 117-84-0 1gm
    • N-11785-10G Dinonyl phthalate 84-76-4 10gm
    • N-11785-5G Dinonyl phthalate 84-76-4 5gm
    • S-11785J4-1ML Dinonyl phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11785J4-5ML Dinonyl phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-11603-1G Di-n-propyl phthalate 131-16-8 1gm
    • S-11603B1-1ML Di-n-propyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Acetone 1mL
    • S-11603B1-5ML Di-n-propyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Acetone 5mL
    • N-11798-10G Diphenyl phthalate 84-62-8 10gm
    • N-11798-5G Diphenyl phthalate 84-62-8 5gm
    • S-11798J1-1ML Diphenyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-11798J1-5ML Diphenyl phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • NG-16455-1G Diphenyl terephthalate 1539-04-4 1gm
    • N-11824-1G Ditridecyl phthalate 119-06-2 1gm
    • N-11826-10G Diundecyl phthalate 3648-20-2 10gm
    • NG-N90-1G Dodecamethylene diammonium terephthalate 1gm
    • N-10353-10G 2-Ethylhexyl isodecyl phthalate 10gm
    • NG-N100-1G Heptamethylene diammonium terephthalate 1gm
    • NG-N200-1G Hexamethylene diammonium terephthalate 1gm
    • N-12177-10G Hexyl 2-ethylhexyl phthalate 75673-16-4 10gm
    • N-12177-5G Hexyl 2-ethylhexyl phthalate 75673-16-4 5gm
    • S-12177J4-1ML Hexyl 2-ethylhexyl phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 1mL
    • S-12177J4-5ML Hexyl 2-ethylhexyl phthalate Solution 1000ug/ml in Hexane 5mL
    • N-12553-10G Hexyl decyl phthalate 25724-58-7 10gm
    • N-12181-10G Hexyl isodecyl phthalate 10gm
    • NG-12182-10G Hexyl isooctyl phthalate 10gm
    • NG-12235-10G Isobutyl cyclohexyl phthalate 10gm
    • N-12247-10G Isodecyl tridecyl phthalate 10gm
    • N-12252-10G Isohexylbenzyl phthalate 10gm
    • NG-12255-10G Isooctyl benzyl phthalate 10gm
    • NG-12258-10G Isooctyl isodecyl phthalate 10gm
    • NG-12312-10G Lead phthalate (dibasic) 17976-43-1 10gm
    • NG-12312-3G Lead phthalate (dibasic) 17976-43-1 3gm
    • NG-I3915-1G Lithium terephthalate 42596-02-1 1gm
    • N-12490-500MG Monobutyl phthalate 131-70-4 500mg
    • N-12490-5G Monobutyl phthalate 131-70-4 5gm
    • MET-11462A-100MG Monomethyl tetrachloroterephthalate 887-54-7 100mg

    • NG-N350-1G m-Xylylene diammonium iso-phthalate 1gm
    • NG-N360-1G m-Xylylene diammonium tere-phthalate 1gm
    • NG-N240-1G Nonamethylene diammonium terephthalate 1gm
    • N-12586-10G Octyl decyl phthalate 119-07-3 10gm
    • N-12721-10G Octyl isodecyl phthalate 10gm
    • S-13016A1-1ML Phenyl mercuric phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Acetonitrile 1mL
    • S-13016U1-1ML Phenyl mercuric phthalate Solution 100ug/ml in Toluene 1mL
    • N-13016-100MG Phenylmercuric phthalate 100mg
    • NG-I5745-1G Sodium phthalate 827-27-0 1gm

      NEW PRODUCTS FROM CHEM SERVICE

      • ICP-MS Tuning Solution 8 in 2% HNO3

      • 2,2',3,4,4',5,6-Heptabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-181) Solution

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      Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT Tel: +44 (0) 151 649 4000 Fax: +44 (0) 151 649 4001 Email: info@greyhoundchrom.com

      Phthalate Standards PDF


      www.greyhoundchrom.com

Monday, May 21, 2018

Certified Reference Standards and Custom Mixtures | Greyhound Chromatography

Periodic Table and flasks

Whatever the mix - if you want it, we will customise it. Having something customised need not be an outrageous request - almost anything is possible! 

If you have any specific product requirements please do get in touch with our sales team who will be happy to help! Simply email sales@greyhoundchrom.com or call +44 (0) 151 649 4000

In addition to this, we also offer a wide range of certified and non-certified Reference Standards from the world’s leading manufacturers, all Guide 34 accredited.

Our Standards library includes standards that are no longer commercially available. We can provide neat products, mixtures, solutions and custom made standards made each to your individual specification.

ChemService is one of our top-selling suppliers for standards and custom mixtures;



Chem Service specialises in providing chemicals in small quantities. This allows you to order only what you need, when you need it.
Environmental Standards - Pesticides - Metabolites - EPA/CLP Test Mixtures - Phalates - PCB Compounds - Deuterated and C13 Standards - ASTM Methods - Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons - Food Analysis Standards - PCB/PBB Standards - High Purity Inorganic Standards - Customised Mixtures

High-Purity Standards Inc. have proudly served the scientific community for the past twenty years with high quality Spectrometric Standards and Reference Materials for AAS, ICP, ICP-MS, GC, GC-MS and IC, and has now expanded our stocked reference materials to include ISO Guide 34 multi-component organic Reference Materials.
Approximately one-half of High-Purity Standards business is in the preparation of custom blends and difficult to prepare special mixtures. In addition, High Purity have recently expanded their Organics lab. Their laboratories are now bigger and better to meet increased demand.
High Purity’s New products of note include expanded spiked filter products in addition to organic reference materials designed to meet EPA testing requirements and additional products from customer requests.
High Purity Standards are accredited to ISO standards: ISO 9001:2008, ISO/IEC 17025:2005 and ISO Guide 34:2009. We can supply copies of these certificates, they are available to download from our website.

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Monday, May 21, 2018

Chem Service Custom Synthesis | Greyhound Chromatography


ChemService

Certified Analytical Reference Standards and Chemicals in Small Quantities

Established in 1962, Chem Service is accredited to ISO Guide 34:2009, ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and registered and certified to the ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management System for the design, development, production, distribution, and servicing of organic neat and synthetic reference materials.

Chem Service, Inc. produces high purity standards for use as reference materials and for other laboratory purposes. More than 95% of their Standards Grade materials have a certified purity of 98.0% or greater and do not require purity corrections when preparing solutions for use with EPA, USTM, UST, and numerous other international methods.

Standards Grade chemicals are clearly labeled with an expiration date that is based on years of experience in handling and testing. Products are packaged in small quantities to minimize storage, waste, and disposal requirements. Organic and inorganic chemicals, solutions, and mixtures are available to meet a wide range of specialized laboratory needs.

                                    

Does your work require something made to your exact requirements?

ChemService synthesize many types of materials including: pesticides, metabolites, environmental standards, explosives, vitamins, and personal care products. Depending on the product, they can produce items from milligrams to kilograms.

Contact our friendly Sales Team on +44 (0) 151 649 4000 or sales@greyhoundchrom.com to arrange a quotation and prompt delivery via our extensive logistics network.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Monday, May 21, 2018

2,3,4,5,6-Pentachlorotoluene Analytical Reference Standard | Chem Service supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Certified Reference Standard 2,3,4,5,6-Pentachlorotoluene Part No: N-10528-50MG

CAS: 877-11-2
Old Catalog Number: F2149
Purity is >98%

Please be advised that this product will be supplied with a Certificate of Analysis.

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Monday, May 14, 2018

Pyrifluquinazon New Insecticide | Greyhound Chromatography

Chem Service - Pyrifluquinazon is a very new insecticide based on a new mode of biological activity.

                                   

Developed by Nichino/Nihon Nohyaku Co. Ltd in Japan, it is not yet listed in The Pesticide Manual or Crop Protection Handbook. Registration in Japan was approved in October 2010 and a 20% formulation has been developed for Japan and China but it is not on the market yet. Registration in other countries has been started; approval of US registration by the EPA is not expected until late 2012.

Pyrifluquinazon has been assigned CAS #337458-27-2. Its formula is C19H15F7N4O2 with M.P. 138-139°C

IUPAC name is 1-acetyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-3-[(3-pyridylmethyl)amino]-6-[1,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1-(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]quinazolin-2-one

CAS name is 1-acetyl-3,4-dihydro-3-[(3-pyridinylmethyl)amino]-6-[1,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1-(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]-2(1H)-quinazolinone

High purity Pyrifluquinazon reference standards are now available exclusively from Chem Service in a 100mg size, P/N N-13158-100MG.

High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials

Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses

Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)

Certification backed with experience: Nearly 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification : ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

 

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Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT     www.greyhoundchrom.com    sales@greyhoundchrom.com

Monday, May 14, 2018

Salannin Analytical Reference Standard | Greyhound Chromatography

Salannin Analytical Reference Standard from Chem Service Inc

Salannin is a chemical compound isolated from Azadirachta indica classified as a Triterpene and used as an antifeedant for the housefly.

Salannin has been assigned CAS #992-20-1.

Its formula is C34H44O9

IUPAC name is (1R,2S,4R,6R,9R,10S,11R,12S,14R,15R,18R)-14-(acetyloxy)-6-(furan-3-yl)-10-(2-methoxy-2-oxoethyl)-7,9,11,15-tetramethyl-3,17-dioxapentacyclo[9.6.1.0^{2,9}.0^{4,8}.0^{15,18}]octadec-7-en-12-yl (2E)-2-methylbut-2-enoate

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Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals supplies Chem Service Reference Standards throughout the world.  Email sales at

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Monday, May 14, 2018

Nimbin Analytical Reference Standard | Greyhound Chromatography

Nimbin Certified Reference Standard

                                                           

Nimbin is an organic chemical compound introduced around 1974 isolated from Azadirachta indica and classified as a Liminin. Nimbin is reported to have anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antifungal, antihistamine and antiseptic properties.

Nimbin has been assigned CAS #5945-86-8.

Its formula is C30H36O9

M.P. 197-199°C (dec.)

IUPAC name is Methyl (2R,3aR,4aS,5R,5aR,6R,9aR,10S,10aR)-5-(acetyloxy)-2-(furan-3-yl)-10-(2-methoxy-2-oxoethyl)-1,6,9a,10a-tetramethyl-9-oxo-3,3a,4a,5,5a,6,9,9a,10,10a-decahydro-2H-cyclopenta[b]naphtho[2,3-d]furan-6-carboxylate
Buy on-line N-12912-5mg

 

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  Greyhound Q-Fil Syringe Filters Catalogue

Friday, May 11, 2018

Phalates of Serious Concern Require Monitoring | Greyhound Chromatography

For nearly 50 years, Chem Service, Inc. has been a producer of environmental and analytical standards that are used worldwide.

Phalates of Serious Concern Require Monitoring

                 

Chem Service's  Standards are precise, accurate and economical.   Chem Service's Phthalate Product Offering is quite extensive and of high quality. Listed below phthalates which have been identified as those of serious concern; requiring monitoring.

These have been identified by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, European Union and Health Canada:


Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, CAS No. 117-81-7


Bis(2-n-butoxyethyl) phthalate, CAS No. 117-83-9


Dibutyl phthalate, CAS No. 84-74-2


Diisodecyl phthalate, CAS No. 26761-40-0


Diisononyl phthalate, CAS No. 68515-48-0


Di-n-octyl phthalate, CAS No. 117-84-0

Chem Service Inc offer over 2000 Pesticides and Metabolites. Over 95% of Chem Service's neat standards grade materials have a purity of 98% or greater.

Chem Service Reference Standards are supplied by:

Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6, Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT    

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Friday, May 11, 2018

Cinosulfuron Sulfonylurea Herbicide Reference Sandard from Greyhound Chromatography

Chem Service's Cinosulfuron is a sulfonylurea herbicide used in flooded rice fields for post-emergent control of grasses and broad-leaved weeds such as water plantain, water clover, pondweed, nutsedge and gooseweed. It was developed by Syngenta (Ciba-Geigy/Novartis) and is primarily used in Asia and Europe.

                                             

Cinosulfuron is a powder and is registered as CAS #94593-91-6. Its formula is C15H19N5O7S with Molecular Weight=413.4 It is classified as a sulfonylurea or triazinylsulfonylurea herbicide. IUPAC name is 1-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-3-[2-(2-methoxyethoxy)phenylsulfonyl]urea.

High purity Cinosulfuron reference standards are now available in a 100mg size, P/N N-11470-100MG. Cinosulfuron can also be incorporated into custom solutions to meet your specifications.

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Thursday, May 10, 2018

Periodic Table |Greyhound Chromatography|Free Download

The Periodic Table

The periodic table of the chemical elements (also periodic table of the elements) is a tabular display of the chemical elements. Although precursors to this table exist, its invention is generally credited to Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869, who intended the table to illustrate recurring periodic trends in the properties of the elements. The layout of the table has been refined and extended over time, as new elements have been discovered, and new theoretical models have been developed to explain chemical behaviour.

Download a free A3 Poster of the Periodic Table.

Over 70 High Purity Standards inc. single element standards are available from Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals. Concentrations include both 1000 and 10.00 in aqueous solution, (unless otherwise noted). Most standards are packaged in 50,100, 250 and 500 mL HDPE or LDPE laboratory grade bottles. The density is provided on the Certificate of Analysis as additional information for the user.

The accuracy of all standards is verified against NIST Spectrometric Standard Solutions. A certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet are included with each standard. Standards are certified accurate for a period of 18 months from the date of shipment unless stated otherwise on the Certificate of Analysis.

The periodic table is now ubiquitous within the academic discipline of chemistry, providing a useful framework to classify, systematise, and compare all of the many different forms of chemical behavior. The table has found many applications in chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering, especially chemical engineering.

In 1789, Antoine Lavoisier published a list of 33 chemical elements. Although Lavoisier grouped the elements into gases, metals, non-metals, and earths, chemists spent the following century searching for a more precise classification scheme. In 1829, Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner observed that many of the elements could be grouped into triads (groups of three) based on their chemical properties. Lithium, sodium, and potassium, for example, were grouped together as being soft, reactive metals. Döbereiner also observed that, when arranged by atomic weight, the second member of each triad was roughly the average of the first and the third. This became known as the Law of triads. German chemist Leopold Gmelin worked with this system, and by 1843 he had identified ten triads, three groups of four, and one group of five. Jean Baptiste Dumas published work in 1857 describing relationships between various groups of metals. Although various chemists were able to identify relationships between small groups of elements, they had yet to build one scheme that encompassed them all.

German chemist August Kekulé had observed in 1858 that carbon has a tendency to bond with other elements in a ratio of one to four. Methane, for example, has one carbon atom and four hydrogen atoms. This concept eventually became known as valency. In 1864, fellow German chemist Julius Lothar Meyer published a table of the 49 known elements arranged by valency. The table revealed that elements with similar properties often shared the same valency.

Of the 94 naturally occurring elements, those with atomic numbers 1 through 40 are all considered to be stable isotopes. Elements with atomic numbers 41 through 82 are apparently stable (except technetium and promethium) but theoretically unstable, or radioactive. The half lives of elements 41 through 82 are so long however that their radioactive decay has yet to be detected by experiment. These theoretical radionuclides have half lives at least 100 million times longer than the estimated age of the universe. Elements with atomic numbers 83 through 94 are unstable to the point that their radioactive decay can be detected. Some of these elements, notably thorium (atomic number 90) and uranium (atomic number 92), have one or more isotopes with half lives long enough to survive as remnants of the explosive stellar nucleosynthesis that produced the heavy elements before the formation of our solar system. For example, at over 1.9×1019 years, over a billion times longer than the current estimated age of the universe, bismuth-209 (atomic number 83) has the longest known alpha decay half life of any naturally occurring element. The very heaviest elements (those beyond plutonium, atomic number 94) undergo radioactive decay with half lives so short that they have only been observed as the result of experimental observation.

Apart from the hydrogen and helium in the universe, which are thought to have been mostly produced in the Big Bang, the chemical elements are thought to have been produced by one of two later processes—either cosmic ray spallation (important for lithium, beryllium and boron), or stellar nucleosynthesis (which produces all elements heavier than boron). Oxygen is the most abundant element in the Earth's crust, making up almost half of its mass Relatively small amounts of elements continue to be produced on Earth as products of natural transmutation processes. This includes production by cosmic rays or other nuclear reactions (see cosmogenic and nucleogenic nuclides), or as decay products of long-lived primordial nuclides.

English chemist John Newlands produced a series of papers in 1864 and 1865 that described his own classification of the elements: he noted that when listed in order of increasing atomic weight, similar physical and chemical properties recurred at intervals of eight, which he likened to the octaves of music. This law of octaves, however, was ridiculed by his contemporaries and the Chemical Society refused to publish his work. Nonetheless, Newlands was able to draft an atomic table and use it to predict the existence of missing elements, such as germanium.

Russian chemistry professor Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev and Julius Lothar Meyer independently published their periodic tables in 1869 and 1870, respectively. They both constructed their tables in a similar manner: by listing the elements in a row or column in order of atomic weight and starting a new row or column when the characteristics of the elements began to repeat. The success of Mendeleev's table came from two decisions he made: The first was to leave gaps in the table when it seemed that the corresponding element had not yet been discovered. Mendeleev was not the first chemist to do so, but he was the first to be recognised as using the trends in his periodic table to predict the properties of those missing elements, such as gallium and germanium.

The second decision was to occasionally ignore the order suggested by the atomic weights and switch adjacent elements, such as cobalt and nickel, to better classify them into chemical families. With the development of theories of atomic structure, it became apparent that Mendeleev had listed the elements in order of increasing atomic number.

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Chemistry of Body Wash | Chem Service Personal Care Products | Greyhound Chromatography

Examine the chemistry of body wash

As chemists and researchers are well aware, chemistry is all around us. From the plastics used in our computer parts to the food we buy at the grocery store, chemicals and chemistry are critical parts of modern daily life. One way that chemicals are used in everyday life is in body wash. This liquid shower soap has replaced the bar for many younger users. Although some chemists may know the basics of soap, the chemistry of body wash is interesting, whether you use it or not.

Where did body wash come from?
Body wash is a personal care product that has become increasingly popular in the last few years. Although people have been using chemicals and natural elements to wash themselves for thousands of years, body wash most directly traces its history to the late 1800s.

In 1865, liquid soap was patented by William Shepphard. Despite this patent, it did not rise to popularity until later, when B.J. Johnson started selling Palmolive liquid soap in 1898. It became so popular that he was forced to rename his company, B.J. Johnson Soap Company, Palmolive.

From Palmolive, a number of other soaps, washes and gels developed throughout the 20th century. Many had specific ingredients tailored to tasks, such as a gentler body wash or a harsher floor cleaner.

What is in body wash?
Because body washes are designed for similar purposes as traditional soap – to remove dirt and odor – their chemicals properties are not so different.

Body washes are usually fairly viscous liquids with a pH between 6 and 7. Surfactants are a critical aspect of body washes because they combine lipophilic and hydrophilic. These fat- and water-soluble ingredients combine to make a mixture that can get rid of the dirt and oils that build up on a person's skin. Ammonium lauryl sulfate and sodium laureth sulfate are two common anionic surfactants that foam and reduce the freezing temperature of the mixture, according to biochemist Gary Neudahl, who wrote on the website Chemists Corner. Alkyl glucosides, taurates and sulfosuccinates are also becoming more common primary surfactants in body wash.

Among surfactants, there are primary and secondary types typically used in a body wash. Combined they can make up about 28 percent of the personal care product. The primary surfactants work to clean the skin. They foam up and cover a large surface, but secondary surfactants are used to reduce discomfort and skin irritation throughout the process, Neudahl explained.

Although surfactants are the most important chemicals used in body washes, from a cleaning perspective there are several others that are significant to their use.

Formaldehyde donors are typically used as inexpensive preservatives. Diethanolamine and other emulsifiers are used to prevent the separation of the various chemicals and ingredients. Biocide chemicals can be used to add an antibacterial aspect to the soap. Many other body wash ingredients have to do with color, scent or specialty features such as suspended beads.

Body washes are a major aspect of many people's daily lives, so it is a good idea to acquaint yourself with the chemicals and chemical types that they use to get people clean.

Author: Christopher Boyd, Chem Service Inc  August 4, 2014 

Chem Service products are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside,

CH41 1LT  Tel:  +44 (0) 151 649 4000  www.greyhoundchrom.com    Email:  info@greyhoundchrom.com

  Chem Service General Catalogue

Thursday, May 10, 2018

What is Cholecalciferol | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards | Greyhound Chromatography

What is Cholecalciferol?

                       

Cholecalciferol is an important chemical for both researchers and consumers. It has a number of uses as Vitamin D3 in the production and creation of health supplements, as well as bone regrowth research and rodent pesticides. But before deciding to take a daily Vitamin D3 supplement or doing research on cholecalciferol, familiarize yourself with the specifics of this compound.

Cholecalciferol details
Cholecalciferol is naturally created in animal tissue. Ultraviolet-B radiation from sunlight begins the production of cholecalciferol by stimulating epidermal 7-dehydrocholesterol. Oregon State University explained that cholecalciferol is more similar to a hormone than a vitamin, which is usually required in a diet because it cannot be synthesized elsewhere in the body. It is structurally similar to steroids like testosterone, cortisol and cholesterol, despite being a secosteroid.

Written chemically as C27H44O or (3S,5Z,7E)-9,10-Secocholesta-5,7,10-trien-3-ol, cholecalciferol is also known as calciol or Vitamin D3. When not being created by mammals, cholecalciferol is a solid resin that can be mixed in a number of ways. As a vitamin, it is often in a gel capsule form, being soluble in water, vegetable oils and organic solvents. Cholecalciferol has a molecular weight of 384.62 and a melting point between 84 and 85 degrees C.

Uses of cholecalciferol
In 1984, cholecalciferol was registered for use as a rodenticide. Cholecalciferol was a major ingredient in these pesticides made by the Dutch manufacturer Phillips-Dunphar and Wisconsin-based Bell Laboratories, the Environmental Protection Agency explained in a report. This chemical compound has been used primarily against Norway rats, roof rats, and house mice. When approved for this use, its toxicology on humans or the environment had not been heavily researched.

Cholecalciferol is most commonly used by consumers and medical researchers for bone and overall health.

Regular consumers take Vitamin D3 as a supplement to help increase calcium absorption and function within the body. People who take this vitamin are often combating a Vitamin D deficiency and its negative health effects, particularly on the skin and bones.

Doctors and medical researchers may use or prescribe the use of Vitamin D for osteomalacia, which is caused by underminalized bones. People may feel tender in their bones and often have weak muscles as well. Rickets and other calcium- and bone-related conditions may also benefit from Vitamin D, but health care professionals are unaware of the consequences of Vitamin D3 on the brain, heart and other organs. The U.S. National Library of Medicine explained that the use of cholecalciferol is not expected to affect any of these major organs, but a Vitamin D deficiency may have consequences on them.

"There currently is little evidence that vitamin D deficiency results in major disorders in these organs and cellular systems. The possibility that vitamin D deficiency may be associated with an increased risk of colon, breast, and prostate cancer has been suggested by epidemiologic evidence from individuals living in higher latitudes, but current evidence is too limited to indicate categorically a cancer risk associated with deficiency," the government body explained.

There are numerous possibilities for cholecalciferol in bone regeneration research and therapeutic medicine for Vitamin D deficiency conditions.

Risks of cholecalciferol
Although cholecalciferol has a number of benefits for humans, it is also a rat poison and can have toxic effects on humans. This underscores the importance of using standards testing while working with cholecalciferol in a lab or research capacity.

People with allergies to Vitamin D, high levels of calcium or mineral absorption should stay away from cholecalciferol. Those with heart or kidney disease may not do well either. You can overdose on this supplement and the side effects may be life threatening. Overdose symptoms include vomiting, headache, metallic taste, skin irritation, bone pain and cloudy headedness.

Cholecalciferol is the rare mix of a vitamin that acts more like a steroid, a healthy supplement as well as a rat poison and something that can both cause and heal bone pain. This makes precision and accuracy of chemical purity critical when working with cholecalciferol.

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Author:  Christopher Boyd, Chem Service Inc    

Chem Service products are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside,

CH41 1LT  Tel: +44 (0) 151 649 4000   www.greyhoundchrom.com   Email:  info@greyhoundchrom.com

Thursday, May 10, 2018

SIKKERHEDSDATABLAD Danish MSDS Now Available Chem Service Products

SIKKERHEDSDATABLAD Danish Lingual MSDS Now Available Chem Service Products


Chem Service are pleased to offer multi lingual MSDS, including Danish, from their website www.chemservice.com


If you require a MSDS in a language other than English and do not see it on their website please contact us info@greyhoundchrom.com and we will provide a translated copy as soon as possible.


Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT buy on-line www.greyhoundchrom.com


CHEM SERVICE STANDARDS YOU CAN RELY ON


High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials


Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses


Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)


Certification backed with experience: Nearly 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :
ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

Shop for Chem Service Certified Reference Standards

Thursday, May 10, 2018

FICHA DE DADOS DE SEGURANÇA Portuguese MSDS Now Available Chem Service Products

FICHA DE DADOS DE SEGURANÇA Portuguese MSDS Now Available Chem Service Products


Chem Service are pleased to offer multi lingual MSDS, including Portuguese, from their website www.chemservice.com


If you require a MSDS in a language other than English and do not see it on their website please contact us info@greyhoundchrom.com and we will provide a translated copy as soon as possible.


Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT buy on-line www.greyhoundchrom.com


CHEM SERVICE STANDARDS YOU CAN RELY ON


High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials


Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses


Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)


Certification backed with experience: Nearly 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :
ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

Shop for Chem Service Certified Reference Standards

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Pentabromodiphenyl Ether (c-pentaBDE) new Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether products | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Chem Service, Inc. now carries 8 new PBDE fire retardants

      Chem Service General Catalogue



Chem Service, Inc. of WEST CHESTER, Pa. is now home to 8 new polybrominated diphenyl ether products. With more than 50 years of experience, Chem Service, Inc. will bring its industry leading quality and purity standards to these new PBDEs as it has to all of its other products.

PBDEs are commonly used as fire retardants in insulation furniture foam, automobiles, building materials, plastics used for electronics and a variety of other products. There are three common forms of PBDEs that are used or mixed together in commercial products to reduce flammability - pentabromodiphenyl ether (c-pentaBDE), decabromodiphenyl ether (c-decaBDE) and octabromodiphenyl ether (c-octaBDE). The classes are determined by the number of bromines attached to each: PentaBDE has five, octaBDE has eight and decaBDE has 10.


The Environmental Protection Agency has consistently added to its significant new use rules on PBDEs in the past decade. Starting with the support of a voluntary end of production of pentaBDEs and octaBDEs in 2004, the EPA has moved to further assess the impact of decaBDE and regulate PBDE safe use in the manufacturing industry. Many of the EPA's actions have been in response to public concern over the use of PBDEs in certain consumer goods, as evidence has suggested that PBDEs do not bond well with many of the materials that they are manufactured with and are potentially harmful to the environment.
These regulations underscore the importance of the proper and safe use of PBDEs for manufacturing. PBDEs from Chem Service, Inc. can be used in a variety of commercial electronics and goods to prevent products from burning easily or spreading fire. Chem Service, Inc. offers 95 percent of its chemicals with a 98 percent purity or higher, so there is no need for purity correction.

The full range of Chem Service Certified Reference Standards is available from Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT Tel:+44 (0)151 649 4000 Fax: +44 (0) 151 649 4001 Email: sales@greyhoundchrom.com


Buy on-line www.greyhoundchrom.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

What is Aldicarb? Greyhound Chromatography Supplies Chem Service Certified Reference Standards

What is Aldicarb?

                                                     

 Aldicarb is an insecticide and member of the carbamate class of chemicals. Although used on a variety of insects, aldicarb is particularly effective as an acaricide, which kills spiders, mites and ticks, as well as a nematicide, which kills nematodes. It has a number of crop applications, including cotton, peanuts, soy and citrus.

Aldicarb grew popular as the active ingredient in the Union Carbide product Temik. This chemical compound is particularly toxic and must be used in a granular mixture at levels as low as 10 or 15 percent of a pesticide. Despite its effectiveness on common pests, aldicarb also has many critics and several controversies over the years.

How it works
Written as C7H14N2O2S or2-Methyl-2-(methylthio)propanal O-(N-methylcarbamoyl)oxime, aldicarb has been manufactured since 1965 and was registered a few years later. This chemical compound works against insects, mammals, arachnids and other types of life by inhibiting the function of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, the Journal of Pesticide Reform explained. This enzyme is critical to the function of the nervous system. Without it, insects cannot create choline from acetychloline. With the enzyme inhibited, nerve and muscle functions are damaged, convulsions occur and pests eventually die.

Why it is considered dangerous
Although designed and primarily used against farm pests, it is one of the most toxic substances ever registered with the Environmental Protection Agency. Humans can be poisoned with aldicarb by breathing the chemical or absorbing it through their skin.

Those who are applying this pesticide are most at risk of exposure. This includes farmers, agriculture workers, chemists, chemical engineers and many others throughout the world where chemicals are not well regulated. In the Caribbean, for example, this chemical is used as an illegal rodenticide in people's homes.

Dizziness, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, partial blindness, cramps, nausea, muscle spasm, small pupils and breathing trouble are human side effects of overexpose to aldicarb.

In the 1980s, this chemical rose to prominence because it tainted many California watermelons in the U.S., poisoning more than 2,000 individuals. It was banned on watermelon and cucumbers thereafter, but was still in use on other fruits and vegetables such as citrus and potatoes in the U.S. In 2010, the EPA and Bayer CropScience, which now makes the chemical, announced that they would fade out production.

"EPA and Bayer CropScience, the manufacturer, have reached an agreement to end use of the pesticide aldicarb in the U.S. A new risk assessment conducted by [the] EPA based on recently submitted toxicity data indicates that aldicarb no longer meets our rigorous food safety standards and may pose unacceptable dietary risks, especially to infants and young children," the EPA announced in 2010.

There are staggered deadlines for varied uses of the chemical. For example, use on potatoes was scheduled to end in 2011, but distribution for the chemical overall could continue until the end of 2016.

Aldicarb may still be used in many other areas of the globe where certain pests make farming near impossible, such as nematodes in northern Africa.

Author:  Christopher Boyd,  Chem Service Inc

Chem Service Products are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT, Email:  info@greyhoundchrom.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

What makes Antiperspirants and Deodorants Work? Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

What makes Antiperspirants and Deodorants Work?

                       

 Antiperspirant and deodorant are commonplace in modern society. Before heading to the lab or leaving your house, you likely apply a stick, roller or gel deodorant to keep yourself sweat-free and smelling fresh throughout the day, but this was not always the case. For millennia people would bath infrequently, with only perfumes and fragrances to prevent natural odour.

It was not until the late 1800s that commercially available, chemically-produced deodorants first came into existence. Today, many deodorants and antiperspirants work together as one unit to prevent sweat and protect against bad odours. Whether you do research with personal care products or you are just a curious consumer, here are chemistry details that make deodorant work.

Aluminum compounds
Aluminum compounds are critical to the success of antiperspirant deodorants. The ions of aluminium compounds are drawn into the epidermis. This causes cells to fill with water and swell, blocking the ducts that secrete sweat, Common compounds used as active ingredients in antiperspirant include aluminium chlorohydrate, aluminium zirconium tricholorohydrex glycine, aluminium chlorohydrate, aluminium hydroxybromid.

Some people have been critical of the use of aluminium in antiperspirants because it may be absorbed into people's systems and lead to negative health effects, such as Alzheimer's disease. But, as the American Chemical Society explained, this correlation between antiperspirants and Alzheimer's is not true.

"In the 1970s, some researchers began to fear that aluminium in antiperspirants could lead to Alzheimer's disease," the ACS explained. "Subsequent studies have convinced the American Alzheimer's Association, a patient advocacy group, and the [U.S.] Food & Drug Administration, which regulates antiperspirants, that the connection between aluminium in antiperspirants and neurodegeneration is a myth."

Other criticisms have tied aluminium in deodorant to breast cancer, but the FDA monitors active ingredient concentrations heavily.

Cyclomethicone
When deodorant was first invented, it was not in a convenient plastic stick tube. People had to use cotton swabs to wipe the solution on themselves. However, as the ACS explained, these solutions were largely made of acid or alcohol, which would dry out skin, cause irritation and eliminate odour at the cost of physical discomfort.

It was not until the 1970s that deodorant producers found a quick-drying chemical that would not irritate skin. It is called cyclomethicone and is used to this day.

Known as 2,2,4,4,6,6,8,8,10,10-decamethyl-1,3,5,7,9,2,4,6,8,10-pentaoxapentasilecane or C10H30O5Si5, cyclomethicone is an odourless, colourless silicone compound that is used in a variety of personal care products. Unlike aluminium compounds, cyclomethicone is too large to pass through the initial layer of skin, so there is no risk of absorption. In Europe, cyclomethicone is regulated for environmental concerns rather than personal health worries.

Antibacterial ingredients
Just as aluminium compounds are the antiperspirant active ingredient in deodorants, antibacterials are the active aspect of odour reduction. Antibacterial ingredients work to eliminate the bacteria that cause bad odours from areas where sweat is common. Many types of deodorants use alcohol ingredients that kill bacteria, while others use artificial chemicals such as triclosan.

Triclosan is used in a number of personal care products including toothpaste. Many people have been critical of this chemical in over-the-counter products. However, the FDA explained that it is not known to cause harm to humans and has been proven to be beneficial in some circumstances, such as fighting gingivitis.

Other ingredients
The other chemicals used in deodorants vary from brand to brand. The humectant propylene glycol is used to prevent the product from drying out, triethanolamine and diethanolamine may be used for pH control, and other colour and scent-specific chemicals may also be used.

Like any personal care products, deodorants and antiperspirants are made from a number of active and inactive ingredients that work toward a common cause and a longer shelf life.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT  Email:  info@greyhoundchrom.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

New Study Raises Questions about Fracking | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards Supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals

New US Study Raises Questions about Fracking

                                                

Fracking is an abbreviated phrase describing the process of hydraulic fracturing, which uses water and other chemicals to extract natural gas out of shale rock. Although fracking and the modern technology used have proven very successful for energy extraction, many residents of nearby areas and nature conservationists have questioned the methods and the toxicity of the chemicals that are part of the fracking fluid.

A series of recent studies and articles have explored what the chemicals used may mean and what the unknown substances could still tell us about human and environmental health. Whether you work on environmental research, petrochemical engineering or you are just curious, check out some of the new studies about fracking chemicals.

American Chemical Society
Presented at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco, new research explained that about one-third of the 200 chemicals used in fracking fluid are unknown quantities. Little research has been done on them. Additionally, eight that are known have been shown to be toxic to mammals.

William Stringfellow, Ph.D., who led a team of researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of the Pacific, said that industrial advocates discuss how many of their chemicals are food grade and potentially safe. But he explained that they are not necessarily properly treated before going back into the environment and some are not safe at all.

"There are a number of chemicals, like corrosion inhibitors and biocides in particular, that are being used in reasonably high concentrations that potentially could have adverse effects," Stringfellow said. "Biocides, for example, are designed to kill bacteria – it's not a benign material."

A Newsweek article discussed the research in depth, noting that some chemicals are hidden from the public and researchers in order for companies to maintain a competitive advantage.

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
An August 2014 study from Sara Souther, a conservation fellow in the Department of Botany at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment also called for more oversight on fracking fluid. Not only did she point to the need for more public knowledge about the chemicals used, Souther asked for more answers when it came to spills and accidents, which are not required to be reported in many states.

"We know very little about how shale gas production is affecting plants and wildlife," Souther said. "And in particular, there is a lack of accessible and reliable information on spills, wastewater disposal and the chemistry of fracturing fluids. Of the 24 U.S. states with active shale gas reservoirs, only five maintain public records of spills and accidents."

Of the 150 wells Souther examined as part of the study, she found two-thirds had at least one chemical used that was not disclosed.

Southeastern Naturalist
A study of a 2007 fracking fluid spill in Kentucky done by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service examined the impact that the incident had on the blackside dace population. Published in the journal Southeastern Naturalist, the study found that the chemical spill led to widespread fish death.

The oil and gas company that was responsible for the spill, Nami Resources Company, LLC, pleaded guilty and was fined $50,000. Hydrochloric acid and a number of other chemicals were found in the spill. The acid is used to dissolve rock and help clear out the previously made fractures, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service explained.

These studies underline the importance of proper use, storage, disposal and understanding when it comes to fracking fluid, which likely will continue to be an important tool moving forward.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT  Email:  info@greyhoundchrom.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Find the Best Chemical for Dealing with Common Pumpkin Pests | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals

Find the Best Chemical for Dealing with Common Pumpkin Pests

       

Pumpkins are an important part of many cultures' Autumn celebrations. People want pumpkins for everything from pies to doorstep decorations, making commercial pumpkin farming a profitable industry.

The types of pumpkins or other Autumn gourds grown determine the pests that can affect them. Some of the most common types of pumpkins include cucurbita maxima, cucurbita moschata and cucurbita argyrosperma. All trace their roots back to North America and northern South America. Cucurbita moschata are the picturesque Jack-o-Lantern pumpkins, but have a variety of other styles as well. Also, pumpkins are vining fruits like watermelons, which changes the pests that find these plants attractive.

Humans are not the only ones who love these autumn gourds. Insects, moulds and diseases are also attracted to these orange fruits. To keep their industry profitable and deliver picturesque, tasty pumpkins, many farmers turn to chemical pesticides to reduce the damage of these pests. Whether you are a farmer, a chemist, a pesticide engineer or just a researcher who loves carving Jack-o-lanterns, explore some of the most common pumpkin pests and which chemicals can help dispatch them.

Phytophthora blight
Phytophthora blight occurs frequently, contributing to a 1A Four-star rank. The USDA North Central Region IPM Center pointed to this as one of the most serious diseases that can affect pumpkins. It is caused by phytophthora capsici, which comes from spores in the soil. The spores are plentiful and invade easily, making control of this disease difficult.

Phytophthora blight can rot seeds, roots, vines, leaves and the fruit itself. Lesions in the vines and leaves may be signs of phytophthora blight, which can lead to crown or total fruit rot. Phytophthora blight may lead to total crop loss and can be financially devastating.

There are a number of chemicals and pesticides that can be used during the planting process and afterward to combat this damaging condition, the USDA North Central Region IPM Center explained. Mefenoxam works well as part of a seed treatment to prevent this blight, while it is also effective for use later on. Dimethomorph, cymoxanil and famoxadone, and chlorothalonil and mefenoxam are all rated as good against this disease. Crop rotation and not using pond water for irrigation are also recommended for avoiding this condition.

Squash vine borer
The squash vine borer looks similar to a wasp and uses pumpkin vines as larval incubators. They lay eggs in the pumpkin's vine, causing wilt and rot. Rick Weinzierl, extension entomologist from the Department of Crop Sciences at the University of Illinois, recommended that farmers look for these pests as soon as the pumpkins begins vining. Unlike most moths, the squash vine borer is out in the daytime and can be spotted through small holes in the vine.

"Treat when first damage is noted and again about a week later," Weinzierl wrote. "Several insecticides are effective for vine borer control, including Capture (bifenthrin), Sevin (carbaryl), Asana (esfenvalerate), Pounce (permethrin), and Ambush (permethrin) … At the small scale, mounding soil around the base of vines can encourage adventitious root growth from portions of the vine beyond the point of vine borer damage."

Squash bug
Weinzierl noted another common insect that can wreak havoc on pumpkins: The squash bug. These pests "move in" to pumpkins in June and July, laying eggs on the leaves. They can cause serious destruction to single plants or entire crops depending on their number. The most destruction may be caused by yellow vine disease, which can be spread through squash bug bacteria.

It is optimal to use pesticide when the nymphs or young squash bugs hatch, about 6 weeks after the eggs are laid. Capture's active ingredient bifenthrin is great for treating these pests. Asana and Pounce are also effective, as is Sabadilla.

Viruses
Viruses are among the most common and difficult problems to manage while growing pumpkins. Typical pumpkin viruses include the Squash Mosaic Virus, Papaya Ringspot Virus, Cucumber Mosaic Virus, Watermelon Mosaic Virus and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus – all of which can affect pumpkins and other plants that they are not named for.

Unfortunately, there are no pesticide solutions to treat these viruses directly. Fungicides, bactericides and pesticides are useless against the actual viruses. The best defense against these is to use pesticides against cucumber beetles, which can carry the viruses. Sevin (carbaryl), Furadan (carbofuran), Capture (bifenthrin), Asana (esfenvalerate), Danitol (fenpropathrin), Ambush (permethrin), Pounce (permethrin), and Admire (imadacloprid) are all rated as good pesticides against cucumber beetles.

Weeds
Pumpkins, like most crops, are not just under attack from bugs, mold, bacteria and viruses, they can also be hurt by weeds such as carpetweed, horseweed, giant ragweed, lambsquarters and many others, the USDA North Central Region IPM Center explained. Roundup (glyphosate) and Sandea (halosulfuron) are commonly used and effective chemicals for dealing with a variety of weeds.

To get a great looking or tasting pumpkin into your home, there are a number of obstacles that need to be overcome including weeds, disease, bugs and other pests.

Author:  Christopher Boyd,   Chem Service Inc.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1 LT  Email: info@greyhoundchrom.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

The Uses of Amicarbazone. Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals

The uses of amicarbazone

                                          

 

Author:   August 29, 2014 Christopher Boyd, Chem Service Inc

Amicarbazone has recently emerged as a new selective broad spectrum herbicide. This chemical compound has proven itself successful with both grasses and broad leaf plants, first registered for use on corn in 2005. As of 2012, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture reported that it has been approved for use on golf courses, sod farms and Christmas tree farms as well as other conifer nurseries and residential turf areas.

This triazolinone herbicide can be applied either before or after emergence of weeds. A 2009 article in the journal Weed Science pointed to amicarbazone's ability to be absorbed both through leaves and roots as a major advantage of this chemical. Additionally, amicarbazone is translocated quickly after applied.

Chemically referred to as 4-amino-N-tert-butyl-4,5-dihydro-3-isopropyl-5-oxo-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-carboxamide or C10H19N5O2, amicarbazone is also known by the commercial names Amicarbazone DF, Xonerate and Dinamic 70 WDG. Amicarbazone works as a photosystem II inhibitor, Weed Science explained.

"This new herbicide is a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, inducing chlorophyll fluorescence and interrupting oxygen evolution ostensibly via binding to the Qb domain of photosystem II (PSII) in a manner similar to the triazines and the triazinones classes of herbicides," the journal wrote.

Although registered for a number of applications, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture explained that it expected this chemical compound to become a specialty substance at country clubs.

"Golf course superintendents are likely to welcome the addition of amicarbazone for control of this critical weed," the state agency explained. "Extension specialists believe that this product will be used in a niche market on greens, tees and less frequently on fairways. Furthermore, this product will probably be used on golf courses that are fastidiously maintained."

How to use amicarbazone
While Minnesota's Department of Agriculture may not think amicarbazone has as many uses as other new herbicides on the market. It is important for golf personnel, superintendents and herbicidal chemists, as well as anyone using this herbicide for crops such as corn to understand the potential dangers and importance of safety when working with this chemical compound.

Amicarbazone has been designed to take the place of fellow herbicide atrazine, which has been banned in the European Union and widely used in the U.S. and Australia. Atrazine has been found to contaminate drinking water. In a study from the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of São Paulo, published in the Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, researchers found that amicarbazone dissolved under "mildly acidic conditions."

This chemical should not be applied if the soil has a pH rating above 7.4. Amicarbazone also should be used in ground equipment including backpacks and hand equipment. It should not be used in an irrigation system and should not be spilled into ponds, rivers or other bodies of water the Minnesota Department of Agriculture explained.

When the EPA first approved the chemical in 2005, they did not complete a thorough analysis of many health effects of the chemical because it was unlikely to be used in a residential atmosphere. Eye irritation may occur from exposure, but more severe effects are unlikely. Those who are using amicarbazone should be most concerned with environmental pollution, which underscores the importance of standard testing when working with herbicides.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT  Email:  info@greyhoundchrom.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Tebuconazole’s Effectiveness, Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Understand tebuconazole’s effectiveness

    

Author:  August 29, 2014 Christopher Boyd, Chem Service, Inc

Tebuconazole is a fungicide that is effective for a variety of landscaping and farming activities. It is especially popular for combating fungi that can harm grapes, cherries, almonds, cereals, and rapeseed or canola. Whether you are a researcher of fungi, an agricultural chemist or a farmer looking to eliminate new pests, learning more about tebuconazole can help you use the chemical compound more safely and effectively.

What is tebuconazole?
Tebuconazole uses a systematic action that can work to prevent and eradicate fungi. This chemical compound eliminates fungi by inhibiting their ability to spread spores, which slows growth.

Tebuconazole is in the chemical class azole and is written as alpha-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-alpha-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol or C16H22ClN3O. Its commercial names include HWG 1608, Bay HWG 1680, Folicur, Raxil and Elite. It has been used across the U.S. and Europe since the early 1990s. Bayer Crop Sciences is a major producer of this fungicide.

Although approved for use by the U.S. and the European Union, some have criticized this chemical compound as dangerous to use on food crops. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established new regulations in 1999, and then reevaluated and ruled on tebuconazole in 2014. The newer ruling established regulations for use on oranges, and still approves the chemical for use on food products as long as it is used as directed.

In 2014, the European Food Safety Authority also examined this chemical compound. The commission used toxicology experts to examine data gathered from active tebuconazole use on crops. The report voiced "concern" for risk to consumers, wild non-target terrestrial vertebrates, wild non-target terrestrial invertebrates, aquatic life, on groundwater and long-term atmospheric transfers in assessments that have neither been finalized nor approved.

Fusarium head blight
Fusarium head blight or head scab is a condition that affects grains such as wheat. When plants develop this disease, farmers can expect much lower yields than normal. But the bigger concern is what causes the head blight. As Purdue University explained, this blight is caused by gibberella zeaem, a fungus that also produces mycotoxins, which can be toxic to humans. The University of Delaware's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources pointed to tebuconazole as an effective fungicide against Fusarium head blight and mycotoxins.

"Fungicide use is recommended as part of an IPM program to manage Fusarium head blight," the university explained. "Tebuconazole has been used in many states to suppress this disease since the 1990s. Currently, the most effective fungicides use metaconazole or a prothioconazole, or a combination of prothioconazole and tebuconazole. All of these fungicides belong to the DMI (group 3) class of fungicides."

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT.  Email: info@greyhoundchrom.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

New Herbicide Indaziflam Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Check out the new herbicide Indaziflam

   

Author:  September 5, 2014 Christopher Boyd, Chem Service Inc

Indaziflam was first registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2010 by Bayer Environmental Science and Bayer Advanced. The commercial and residential products that were approved ranged from technical herbicides that contained more than 95 percent of the chemical compound to fertilizers that featured miniscule amounts of indaziflam as a herbicidal ingredient.

Whether you are a golf course superintendent considering using indaziflam on your links this year, or a chemist looking at new herbicides for research, it is a good idea to learn more about this up-and-coming multiuse pesticide.

What is indaziflam?
Indaziflam belongs to the alkylazine class of chemicals and works as both a pre- and post-emergence herbicide for annual grasses and broadleaf weeds. This chemical compound has been cleared for use on residential and commercial property such as golf courses, lawns, walkways, cemeteries, evergreen nurseries and landscaping projects. Indaziflam works well against crabgrass, goosegrass, kyllinga, bluegrass, doveweed, swinecress, bittercress and henbit among many other plants, according to North Carolina State University Turf Research. This chemical compound has also been registered in Latin America, Asia and Australia.

Indaziflam's International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry name is N2-[(1R,2S)-2,3-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-1H-inden-1-yl]-6-[(1RS)-1-fluoroethyl]-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, while it is written chemically as C16H20FN5. The chemical's mode of action involves preventing or inhibiting cellulose biosynthesis in the cell wall. In a 2012 issue of the Pakistan Journal of Weed Science, indaziflam was called the "most potent inhibitor of cellulose biosynthesis so far discovered."

More recently than indaziflam's 2010 registration for turf and grasses, Bayer has come out with a new formulation that features indaziflam for citrus, tree nuts, grapes and sugarcane. It is sold under the names Alion™, Specticle™ and Esplanade™. In 2013, Bayer CropScience won an Agrow Award for Best New Crop Protection Product or Trait for the ingredient indaziflam in its products. Agrow Awards honour leaders in pesticides and crop protection.

"We are incredibly honoured to receive this prestigious award," explained Hermann Stübler, head of weed control research at Bayer CropScience at the ceremony, Bayer's website reported. "The need for new herbicides with alternative modes of action and resistance breaking capabilities is more urgent than ever. In a team effort we created and developed indaziflam, employing our leading expertise in herbicide research and our deep knowledge of weed control."

Application risks
Indaziflam can be applied as a liquid, water soluble packet or granule formulation with groundboom, broadcast sprayers, cyclone granule spreaders or grinders, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation explained. Risks are expected to be low and should not be treated differently than other herbicides. The Department of Environmental Conservation outlined acceptable margins of exposure.

Indaziflam is becoming a popular herbicide choice, explore whether this is a useful tool for your work.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT  Email:  info@greyhoundchrom.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

International Pesticides Play Pivotal Role in African Wildlife Exploitation | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards Supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Pesticides been illegally used by hunters in Africa


Anyone who has ever lived in or visited Africa understands how the continent's natural wildlife is a signature trademark. Many of the creatures that are native to Africa cannot be found elsewhere, and their beauty has to be seen up close in their natural habitat to truly be appreciated. However, that has not stopped poachers and others from trying to exploit them for monetary gain on the black market. Efforts to capture these animals have included the use of firearms and poisoning through pesticides.

The strength of the national laws in Africa pertaining to pesticides, as well as the faithfulness with which they are enforced, have varied throughout the continent. One expert published a study in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, which discusses the history of pesticide use in Africa, particularly within the context of wildlife killings.

Bans and stronger regulations are recommended
Darcy Ogada of The Peregrine Fund in Boise, Idaho, and the National Museums of Kenya in Nairobi noted that 83 percent of African nations have laws making it illegal to hunt wildlife with poison. However, Ogada asserted that both regulations and their enforcement are weak. To provide context, she discussed why pesticides are used for wildlife killing.

"Common reasons for poisoning are control of damage-causing animals, harvesting fish and bushmeat, harvesting animals for traditional medicine, poaching for wildlife products and killing wildlife sentinels (e.g., vultures because their aerial circling alerts authorities to poachers' activities)," Ogada wrote in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. "Populations of scavengers, particularly vultures, have been decimated by poisoning."

The most common methods of wildlife poisoning used by poaches and hunters include baiting of carcasses, soaking grains in pesticide solutions, contaminating animals' water sources and creating salt licks by mixing poisonous chemical compounds together.

According to Ogada, carbofuran is the most commonly used pesticide in illegal activities against wildlife. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency pulled many of the approved uses of carbofuran in 2009 because of the growing body of research indicating that the insecticide/nematicide had a high level of environmental toxicity. That year, all uses of carbofuran in the U.S. were canceled, with the exception of applications for field corn, pumpkins, sunflowers, potatoes, spinach and pine seedlings. Farmers were allowed to use up carbofuran supplies through the end of 2009, while non-food use was permissible so long as it was in compliance with label instructions.

When it comes to human health, high levels of carbofuran exposure have been associated with damage to the blood-forming, nervous and reproductive systems.

To remedy illegal use of pesticides in African wildlife hunting, Ogada proposed strengthening current laws pertaining to poisons.

"Recommendations include banning pesticides, improving pesticide regulations and controlling distribution, better enforcement and stiffer penalties for offenders, increasing international support and awareness, and developing regional pesticide centers," Ogada wrote.

Tighter regulations on pesticide use in Africa may help protect wildlife on the continent, thus ensuring the health of Africa's beautiful and fragile ecosystem.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography , 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Study links styrene and chromium in air pollution to autism | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Study links styrene and chromium in air pollution to autism


In the U.S., there are many sources of air pollution. Greenhouse gases are particulates that are found in vehicular emissions, factory exhaust and the cumulative waste excreted from factory farm livestock. Regardless of the source, reduction of air pollution is essential to the long-term health of citizens because chemical compounds in the air have been linked to several chronic diseases, including asthma.

Now, there is evidence suggesting that air pollution is not only harmful to people, but also to developing fetuses. Specifically, styrene, chromium and other airborne toxins have been tied to the growing prevalence of autism spectrum disorders, as presented before the American Association for Aerosol Research's annual meeting.

What are sytrene andchromium?
According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, styrene is a compound that is used in the manufacturing of resins and polystyrene plastics. The authors of the new study noted that styrene is released into the air during the combustion of gasoline. Experts from the EPA assert that acute exposure to styrene may cause irritation to the mucus membranes and eyes, as well as gastrointestinal problems. Chronic exposure to styrene may lead to headache, fatigue, problems with the central nervous system and other issues. Meanwhile, chromium is a heavy metal that can enter the atmosphere as a byproduct of power plant operations and the process through which steel is hardened.

To understand the link between these and other components of air pollution and the prevalence of ASD, a team of scientists from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health interviewed 217 families that included children with autism who were born between 2005 and 2009. All participating parents, who lived within six specific counties in Pennsylvania, completed a copy of the National Air Toxics Assessment, which measured their exposure to 30 air pollutants during pregnancy as well as during the first two years of their children's lives.

Results suggested that the higher levels of exposure to styrene and chromium were linked to a risk increase of ASD between 1.4 and 2 times higher than normal. This trend became apparent after controlling for factors such as maternal age, maternal smoking, levels of education attainment and race.

The risk of ASD also went up with levels of arsenic, cyanide, methanol and methylene chloride, but because these chemical compounds are often found in combination with each other, more research is needed to determine which of them actually makes an impact.

"This study brings us a step closer toward understanding why autism affects so many families in the Pittsburgh region and nationwide – and reinforces in sobering detail that air quality matters," Grant Oliphant, president of The Heinz Endowments, which funded the study, said in a statement. "Our aspirations for truly becoming the most livable city cannot be realized if our children's health is threatened by dangerous levels of air toxics. Addressing this issue must remain one of our region's top priorities."

"The next step will be confirming our findings with studies that measure the specific exposure to air pollutants at an individual level to verify these EPA-modeled estimates," added principal investigator Evelyn Talbott, Dr.P.H.

Why is autism becoming more prominent?
About 1 in 68 children in the U.S. are born on the spectrum of ASD, which is an eightfold increase over the course of 20 years. The authors of the new study asserted that this increase in prevalence is only partially attributable to increased public awareness and improvements in diagnostic practices, suggesting that environment can play a factor.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the development of ASD is also influenced by genes, certain prescription drugs taken during pregnancy and advanced parental age.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Link between pesticides and birth defect in boys is weak | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Link between pesticides and birth defect in boys is weak


A growing body of evidence shows that pesticides have powerful repercussions beyond their intended use. Aside from killing pests that threaten farmers' crops, they may also be harmful to benign species and humans. These effects may be found among those who are directly exposed to pesticides, or they may occur in offspring.

Previously, a number of studies suggested that adults exposed to pesticides may be more likely than those who were not to have male children born with hypospadias, a birth defect in which the opening of the urethra is found somewhere on the penis other than the tip. However, conflicting evidence prompted one team of researchers from Stanford University Medical Center to conduct their own study on males born in eight California Counties between 1991 and 2004. They discovered that certain pesticides may be tied to the incidence of hypospadias, but concluded that the link they found was weak, as published in the journal Pediatrics.

What is the burden of hypospadias?
According to the Hypospadias and Epispadias Association, hypospadias affects as many 1 in every 125 live births in the U.S. The severity of the condition depends in part on where the urethral opening forms along the penis. In the mildest cases, it forms a short distance away from the tip of the penis, while in the most severe cases, the opening may appear closer to the scrotum. Additionally, this condition is often accompanied by an extreme curvature of the penis. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that hypospadias may make males unable to urinate standing up, and in severe cases, it may make sexual intercourse difficult.

There are no clear causes for hypospadias, but various studies have suggested several risk factors, including maternal obesity during pregnancy, advanced maternal age, fertility treatments and hormones taken either before or during pregnancy.

Most cases of hypospadias require surgical correction, which is done in stages while boys are between the ages of 3 and 18 months. The goal is to correct the placement of the urethral opening, reduce the curvature of the penis and replace the skin in appropriate places on the penis.

Rare exposures complicate research
To understand whether parental exposure to pesticides increases the risk of hypospadias in male children, the authors of the study reviewed 690 cases of the birth defect and compared them to nearly 2,200 randomly selected controls. The study population came from eight counties in California's Central Valley, which has one of the highest rates of pesticide use in the nation. This information was compared to information on maternal exposure to 292 chemical compounds and 57 groups of structurally similar chemicals, primarily between weeks one and 14 of pregnancy.

Ultimately, the researchers found slight connections between hypospadias and 15 chemical compounds. Other results showed that there is no evidence that maternal exposure to multiple pesticides at the same increases the risk of hypospadias.

"We did not see many chemicals that suggested an increased risk, and of those that did, most of them were infrequently used," Suzan Carmichael, Ph.D., associate professor of pediatrics and lead author of the study, said in a statement. "It is good news that such exposures are rare, but at the same time, when exposures are rare, it makes studies harder to do."

According to the CDC, expectant mothers can take steps to help reduce the likelihood their sons are born with hypospadias. These include taking a multivitamin that contains at least 400 micrograms of folic acid, and refraining from alcohol consumption and tobacco use.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Study emphasizes importance of reducing nitrogen pollution from fertilizer | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Study emphasizes importance of reducing nitrogen pollution from fertilizer


Environmental experts monitor agricultural activity in the U.S. to make sure that farmers' industrial practices are minimally harmful. The industry requires companies to use pesticides, fertilizers and other chemical compounds, all of which may have negative effects on the health of consumers or the environment if they are used improperly or contaminate local resources.

One of the major sources of agricultural pollution is nitrogen-based fertilizers. Although nitrogen is essential to maximizing crop yields, industry-wide improper use of fertilizer can have dramatic repercussions around the world. However, one team of scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research suggested that nitrogen pollution can be cut in half through various mitigation measures, thereby curbing unnecessary expenses for the economy and protecting people's health, as published in the journal Nature Communications.

Why is nitrogen so dangerous?
According to the Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership, which is a project supported by the University of New Hampshire and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, nitrogen is a nutrient that can lead to abnormally robust algae growth if it ends up in bodies of water. The algae can block out the sunlight that other plant life need to grow, and when the algae die, the decomposition depletes the water of oxygen. This condition, known as hypoxia, causes other plant and animal life in the water to die.

Furthermore, the EPA noted that algal blooms make water non-potable for humans. People who drink this water may develop rashes, respiratory problems, stomach or liver illness, or problems with the nervous system. Additionally, disinfectants in treated water may react with algae to produce dioxins. These byproducts have been linked to cancer and other health problems.

Food production can become more efficient, cleaner
Improper or inefficient applications of nitrogen-based fertilizer in agriculture can cause the nutrients to contaminate runoff and end up in water sources. According to the authors of the Nature Communications study, every other ton of nitrogen applied in agriculture ends up in runoff, gets blown elsewhere by the wind or gets decomposed by microorganisms. In Europe, between 1 percent and 4 percent of economic output is covered by the damages of nitrogen-based pollution, accounting for billions of Euros. Ultimately, if no actions are taken, the amount of nitrogen pollution in the environment will grow by 20 percent by 2050, as estimated by the Potsdam researchers.

To get a better grasp on the problem, they ran various computer scenarios in their lab, and concluded that the combination of various mitigation measures could actually cut nitrogen pollution in half.

"For consumers in developed countries, halving food waste, meat consumption and related feed use would not only benefit their health and their wallet," study co-author Alexander Popp said in a statement. "Both changes would also increase the overall resource efficiency of food production and reduce pollution."

The researchers also suggested that fertilizer application be more targeted for plants through use of soil measurements. Additionally, animal waste can be processed into another source of nitrogen-rich fertilizer.

According to experts at the EPA, one way farmers can control nitrogen pollution is by using controlled-release fertilizers. These only have to be applied once a year, and release nitrogen into the soil gradually enough that they are less likely than standard fertilizers to leach into the soil or get washed away with the runoff. Timed release is usually dependent on temperature settings.

According to the Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership, nitrogen pollution is not just a result of agriculture. It may also come from poorly maintained septic tanks and inadequate water treatment infrastructure.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Pesticides from Costa Rican banana farms are harming crocs | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Pesticides from Costa Rican banana farms are harming crocodiles


As in any other ecosystem, the health of the rainforest depends on a delicate balance among its inhabitants. When it comes to the food chain, keystone species are in charge of controlling the population of animals upon which they prey, according to the Rainforest Alliance. Without these keystone species, the balance of life and resources within this ecosystem becomes upset.

One example of a keystone species in the rainforest is the spectacled caiman crocodile, which eats a wide range of animals that include fish, crustaceans and mammals, such as wild pigs. In Costa Rica, the Tortuguero Conservation Area is a nature preserve that provides a safe space for plants and animals to thrive. However, rivers and streams that feed into the preserve may carry pollutants and poisons, including pesticides, that threaten life in the ecosystem.

One team of scientists from Stellenbosch University in South Africa observed that spectacled caiman in the preserve carry high levels of nine pesticides in their bodies, as published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. Surrounding banana plantations are the likely culprit.

Research justifies more regulatory infrastructure
According to the authors of the new study, 10 percent of the global banana supply comes from Costa Rica. Because of the importance of this crop to the economy, the use of pesticides in Costa Rica doubled during the past two decades. Currently, the nation ranks second in the world in terms of pesticide use intensity.

To estimate the impact of these trends on spectacled caiman, the researchers collected blood samples from 14 of the reptiles and analyzed them for the presence of 70 types of pesticides. Compared to crocodiles found outside the conservation area, caiman from the Tortuguero carried higher traces of nine pesticides. These substances can easily end up in the Tortuguero preserve as part of the runoff from farms when it rains.

In descending order, these chemical compounds were:


Dieldrin
Permethrin
Mirex
4,4′-DDE 
Alpha-endosulfan
Heptachlor epoxide
Oxychlordane
Heptachlor
Cypermethrin

Seven of these pesticides were actually banned by the 2011 Stockholm Convention. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, dieldrin was an insecticide that was widely used in the U.S. between 1950 and 1974. It was applied to corn, cotton and citrus crops. Eventually, the use of dieldrin was banned in the U.S. because of studies that indicated it had negative effects on the health of humans. Specifically, dieldrin was linked to weakened immune systems, reduced reproductive success, birth defects, kidney damage and cancer.

The EPA also noted that dieldrin does not break down easily and tends to bioaccumulate up the food chain. This is why dieldrin and various pesticides can be dangerous for spectacled caiman and other keystone species.

"Caiman and other aquatic species have been exposed to pesticides from upstream banana plantations, even in remote areas of a national wilderness area," study author Paul Grant said in a statement. "Banana plantations may be economically important to Costa Rica; however their erosion of aquatic ecosystems highlights the need for a developed regulatory infrastructure and adequate enforcement."

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Researchers trace phosphorus pollution in Midwestern lake | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Researchers trace phosphorus pollution in Midwestern lake


The lakes of Midwestern states, such as Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois, all have a reputation for being beautiful. This makes them a major draw to nature lovers, fishers and boating enthusiasts – a fact that underscores the importance of maintaining the lakes' health for the sake of the environment and the local economies. Residents and companies near the lake have to be sure to refrain from dumping certain chemical solutions into the water.

One source of environmental pollution that has drawn a lot of attention is agriculture. The large volume of crops grown and livestock raised have attracted attention because of the use of inorganic fertilizers and pesticides. Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus have been known to wash away in runoff and contaminate watersheds. However, when it comes to Lake Pepin, which sits on the border of Minnesota and Wisconsin, researchers from the University of Minnesota concluded that historic industrial use may be more to blame for water pollution than agriculture, as published in the Journal of Environmental Quality.

Why is phosphorus so bad for water?
Similar to nitrogen, phosphorus is a mineral that is often found in agricultural fertilizers. When it ends up in streams, rivers and lakes, it is likely to lead to algal blooms. Any explosion in algae populations will prevent sunlight from nourishing other plants in the waters, which will disrupt the local food chain. Additionally, when the algae die, the decomposition process depletes the oxygen supply in the water. This creates areas known as "dead zones," which are unable to support aquatic life.

In addition to harming the local food chain, algae will also produce toxins that can significantly contaminate drinking water supplies. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who consume algal toxins may develop rashes, gastrointestinal distress, neurological problems and respiratory issues.

Sewage, industry are to blame
The authors of the new study noted that algal blooms have hurt fish and recreational activities in Lake Pepin. They noted that phosphorus seemed to be the biggest factor driving algae growth in the lake. To better understand the source of phosphorus pollution, they investigated the sediments upstream of Lake Pepin. Ultimately, they discovered that, before 1850, selective water transport of finer sediments over heavier sediments – the former of which had more phosphorus – was responsible for most of the phosphorus in the lake. After 1850, local businesses played a major factor, and none of them were agricultural.

"Our research shows that [for Lake Pepin] most sediment phosphorus is likely the sewage and industrial phosphorus that was picked up by riverbank sediments," study co-author Satish Gupta, a University of Minnesota professor, said in a statement.

Instead of agriculture, meat processing was the likely source of phosphorus contamination, and several plants were built in the area after 1850. Additionally, the lack of sewage treatment plants before the 1930s meant that "all domestic raw sewage and industrial waste was dumped in the rivers upstream of Lake Pepin," Gupta said.

In the interest of reducing phosphorus pollution in the lake, the study authors recommended upgrading sewage treatment plants, which can be a major contributor to contamination. Specifically, plants need to be upgraded near the Twin Cities area, and all along the Minnesota and Mississippi river basins upstream of the lake.

Part of what is complicating matters is the fact that there are numeric water quality standards for phosphorus and algae, but not nitrogen, when it comes to lakes in Minnesota, according to the Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy. Furthermore, no such policies exist to help protect rivers and streams in the state.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

New Products Alert: Supplied by ChemService

           

New Chem Service Products

New Products have just been added to our store!


ChemService have developed a range of new products that are now fully available for ordering online in our store.

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For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

Tel:     +44 (0)151 649 4000
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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Effects of Methoxychlor Felt for Generations | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards Supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Effects of Methoxychlor Felt for Generations


In the 1970s, methoxychlor was seen as a safer alternative to the pesticide DDT and was used extensively as a replacement. However, methoxychlor was banned in the U.S. in 2003 due to a variety of negative health effects. A recent study from Washington State University explained that the effects of methoxychlor may be felt by the grandchildren of those who came in contact with the chemical compound.

WSU researchers concluded that methoxychlor exposure could lead to ovarian disease, obesity and kidney disease in later generations following a study done on rats. Published in the PLOS ONE and funded by the National Institutes of Health, the researchers used methoxychlor with pregnant rats and saw higher rates of these medical conditions in the next three generations of offspring. It is called transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.

Lead researcher, WSU professor and founder of its Center for Reproductive Biology, Michael Skinner explained that this could have a significant impact on many Americans – present and future – because a number of adults have been exposed to methoxychlor at some point in their lives. The impact of this may still yet to be seen.

"What your great-grandmother was exposed to during pregnancy, like the pesticide methoxychlor, may promote a dramatic increase in your susceptibility to develop disease, and you will pass this on to your grandchildren in the absence of any continued exposures," Skinner said in a release.

What is methoxychlor?
Methoxychlor is a man-made organic halogen chemical compound used as an insecticide. Although similar in function, methoxychlor does not accumulate in the fatty tissue of animals as DDT did. Methoxychlor is also known by commercial names such as Marlate, Metox, Moxie, Chemform, Methoxo, and the chemical name 1.1.1-Trichloro-2.2-bis[p-methoxyphenyl]ethane. Molecularly written as C16H15Cl3O2, methoxychlor is a yellowish powder that has a sweet, fruity scent.

This pesticide is used on flies, mosquitoes, cockroaches, chiggers and other pests. It kills insects through consumption or contact. Methoxychlor has been used on a number of crops, trees and other plants including fruit and vegetables. Additionally, it was registered for use against parasites with cattle, animal feed, pets and home gardens.

How did it get into people's systems?
The WSU study is significant for many Americans because methoxychlor was so widely used that accidental consumption was possible. The Environmental Protection Agency explained that people can be exposed to methoxychlor through breathing the chemical in or eating contaminated food.

The people most at risk were those who worked in laboratories or factories where methoxychlor was manufactured or used. There are also possibly high levels of methoxychlor on farms, or in the soil and water near farms. Consumers who used the insecticide on their home garden or pets would also be at risk. The EPA put 0.005 milligrams per day as the maximum allowed for safe consumption of methoxychlor.

When mixed for use, methoxychlor has 88 percent purity. This makes standards testing of methoxychlor critical to ensure safe usage of the pesticide. Using the product in the correct way is also important, as contamination of food or water can happen easily at such high purity numbers. Pollution of water and air by methoxychlor has been a serious concern since it was used in the 1970s.

In a World Health Organization study of methoxychlor, it was found that the chemical persisted in the water near farms that used the pesticide.

"Although methoxychlor is poorly soluble in water, it has been found in surface water, groundwater and drinking-water. Only 1 out of 71 groundwater samples from rural areas contained methoxychlor at 0.09 µg/litre, but concentrations of up to 50 µg/litre were detected in both surface water and groundwater close to agricultural areas where it was applied. Drinking-water in two rural areas in the USA was reported to contain methoxychlor at concentrations of up to 312 µg/litre (mean 33 ng/litre) and 100 µg/litre (mean 23 ng/litre), respectively," the report explained.

WSU's study sheds a light on the long-term effects of this now-banned insecticide, and underscores the importance of safety when using this chemical to avoid serious health concerns.

Author: Christopher Boyd, Chem Service Inc   July 29, 2014 

Chem Service products are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT

Tel: +44 (0) 151 649 4000    www.greyhoundchrom.com      Email:  info@greyhoundchrom.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Caffeine is in more than just your coffee | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards | Greyhound Chromatography

Caffeine is in more than just your coffee

                                           

When researchers are spending late nights poring over notes and waking up early the next morning to work in the lab, many turn to tea or coffee for a little caffeine boost. However, unless you engineer personal care products, you may not realize that caffeine is a chemical compound commonly used in cosmetics and other health and medical products.

Caffeine is an organic compound that is found in a variety of consumable plants. Written molecularly as C8H10N4O2, caffeine is sometimes called methyltheobromine, guaranine, koffein, mateina, theine, 1,3,7-trimethylxanthine, cafeina or thein – often because of the plant that it is found in. An alkaloid and a purine, caffeine can also be made synthetically from uric acid.

Although many consumers likely do not think of their tea or coffee as a drug, it has strong physiological effects on humans and is the most used drug in the world. As Scientific American magazine explained, caffeine inhibits normal cell function in humans.

"At the cellular level, caffeine blocks the action of a chemical called phosphodiesterase (PDE). Inside cells, PDE normally breaks down the second chemical messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Many hormones and neurotransmitters cannot cross the cell membrane, and so they exert their actions indirectly via such second messengers; when they bind to a receptor on the surface of a cell, it initiates a chemical chain reaction called an enzyme cascade that results in the formation of second messenger chemicals," the magazine explained.

After cAMP stops being broken down, caffeine's effects are felt throughout the body where it acts as a stimulant and an antagonist of the central nervous system. For example, the heart pumps more rapidly because of higher norepinephrine and epinephrine levels in response to caffeine. The caffeine chemical compound works to make the effects of epinephrine last longer, giving people a high or stimulation.

Personal care uses of caffeine
Caffeine makes blood vessels constrict and may even prevent some unwanted enzymes in certain cells. These side effects make caffeine a good candidate for personal care products. The average consumer - even lab researchers – may not realize that their cosmetics contain caffeine.

One major use of caffeine is in anti-wrinkle and skin tightening creams and lotions. Some companies use it in cellulite treatments as well. In Japan, India and a number of other countries, caffeine is used to make skin smoother, firmer and tighter, Cosmetics and Toiletries magazine explained. The idea is that it will stimulate the skin cells and blood vessels to constrict and tighten up.

In Europe, caffeine has been a key ingredient in shampoos that claim to stimulate hair growth or combat hair loss, such as Switzerland's Koffein Tonikum Caffeine Anti-Hairloss Tonic by Bircal. Caffeine is also a component of a number of facial creams that seek to address skin damage. There is not a strong history of evidence that these are effective treatments, but many of the producers of these products swear by their effectiveness and caffeine is a drug that has definite physiological effects on the body.

Medicinal uses
However, caffeine has been found to reduce the likelihood of diabetes in a Harvard University study that examined 126,000 participants. People who consumed between 1 and 3 cups of coffee a day were less likely to develop diabetes.

As a purinergic P1 receptor antagonist, phosphodiesterase inhibitor and a CNS stimulant, caffeine can be a useful tool in health care. Caffeine has been used as a breathing aid. It is one of the chemical compounds used for the treatment of premature babies with trouble breathing as well as adults with apnea.

There are many scientific and medical studies into the effectiveness of various caffeine treatments.

Next time you grab a quick cup of tea or your second coffee of the morning, think about how it affects your body and the alternate benefits it may have for your skin, hair and body.

Author:  July 24, 2014 Christopher Boyd, Chem Service Inc

Chem Service products are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside,

CH41 1LT  Tel:  +44 (0) 151 649 4000    www.greyhoundchrom.com     Email: info@greyhoundchrom.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Analyze the Herbicide Sulcotrione’s Impact on Consumers | Chem Service Pesticides | Greyhound Chromatography

Analyze the Herbicide Sulcotrione’s Impact on Consumers


                                      

In the U.S., China and Europe, sulcotrione is used as an herbicide for farming. Sulcotrione works to inhibit 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, better known as HPPD, in plants, the journal Herbicides, Theory and Applications explained. This triketone-type herbicide is commonly used on weeds and other unwanted vegetation to protect crop grasses like wheat, barley, and corn or maize.

Like many pesticides used in commercial farming operations, it is important that the chemicals designed for effectively killing invasive plants are not also harmful for human consumption, as they may be absorbed by food through the soil. Here are a few of the most prominent studies done of the herbicide and how it reacts with humans and the environment.

European Chemicals Agency study
In 2011, the European Chemicals Agency Committee for Risk Assessment adopted the opinion that sulcotriones fit the category of a substance that is a hazard to aquatic plant life and should be labeled as such.

"Sulcotrione therefore fulfills the criteria for classification as aquatic environmental hazard acute category 1, H400 and aquatic environmental hazard chronic category 1, H410." the ECHA report found after analyzing an array of data.

The chemical's degradability in varied PHs, its ecotoxicity, and bioaccumulation were considered when deciding that it should be labeled differently and concentration restrictions should be put in place.

During the course of researching the herbicide's effects, researchers concluded that there were no notable health detriments noticed to humans. Monkeys and rats passed the chemical quickly through their waste, mostly as urine.

The only area where danger was observed was in plants in a water ecosystem. The report explained that this was logical because, "the relative sensitivity of aquatic plants reflects the intended function of the substance (a herbicide)."

Other relevant studies
There are several other studies that also analyze sulcotrione's impact, some of which may have been used in the ECHA's decision.

A 2002 study from scientists at of the Korea Research Institute Chemical Technology looked at diuron, fluridone, or sulcotrione in relation to chlorophyll and carotenoid reduction. They found evidence that the stopping electron transport by limiting the amount of plastoquinone in plants is a reason for the herbicide's effectiveness.

Researchers from Université Blaise-Pascal in France found in 2009 with photochemical experiments that sulcotriones became more toxic to the environment than with itself and its metabolites alone. The researchers suggested that the material be used in further experiments.

Like many herbicides, sulcotrione can be harmful to the environment in certain circumstances, past the desired effects. This underscores the importance of pesticide standards testing and proper use of an herbicide, or there may be unintended negative consequences for the area around the farm.

Author:July 2, 2014 Christopher Boyd, Chem Service Inc

Chem Service products are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside,

CH41 1LT Tel: +44 (0) 151 649 4000 www.greyhoundchrom.com Email: info@greyhoundchrom.com

                            

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Why do bananas require so many pesticides? | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards

 Why do bananas require so many pesticides?

                                                                             


Bananas are the most popular fruit in the world. About 115 million tons of bananas are consumed each year, produced in more than 100 countries. Americans eat more bananas than any other fruit, consuming 6.4 billion bananas a year on its own, with every American each eating an average of 10 pounds per year.

Despite this massive demand for bananas, the sweet fruit cannot be grown in the U.S. The burden of supplying the global banana hunger falls on countries in the tropics, including Costa Rica, India, Brazil, Ecuador and many others. Although these countries have excellent climates for growing bananas, they also breed a variety of pests and fungi that can wreak havoc on this popular crop.

The chief of sustainable agriculture for the nonprofit organization Rainforest Alliance Chris Willie talked to NPR's All Things Considered about how the climate presents a variety of dangers to banana harvesting. He explained that the warm, humid, remote plantations are prone to the growth of an airborne fungus called Black Sigotoka. This growth can destroy an entire plantation in about a week – a costly problem for this profitable fruit.

Worms, fruit-hungry insects and tree diseases are also common problems in banana plantations, Willie told NPR. To combat these risk factors, most banana farmers and fruit companies turn to a cocktail of pesticides that can help reduce the damage from each of the banana's many enemies. Examine some the most common pesticides used on banana plantations to understand the industry better, whether as a researcher or consumer.


Chlorpyrifos - An insecticide, acaricide and miticide, chlorpyrifos is an organophosphate used on many crops throughout the world. Although formerly used as a household insecticide, the Environmental Protection Agency has placed many restrictions on the product, which has been found to have negative effects on those who use the chemical compound. Chlorpyrifos, chemically written as C9H11Cl3NO3PS, has been in use for more than 40 years and is seen by some as a smart alternative to pesticides that kill beneficial insects.


Thiabendazole – ​Thiabendazole, also known as the medications Mintezol and Tresaderm, is a fungicide and parasiticide that is used on banana planatations. Its chemical formula is C10H7N3S. Thiabendazole is the most common pesticide residue found in bananas, occuring in 48.1 percent of the bananas tested, according to the Pesticide Action Network North America. Although banana farmers use particularly high amounts of pesticides, with the Environmental Working Group putting the number at 35 pounds per acre, the residues aside from thiabendazole are particularly low because the banana peel protects the edible portion from many chemicals.


Azoxystrobin - Azoxystrobin is also a fungicide, used for a variety of produce farming. Known by commercial names including Amistar and Heritage, azoxystrobin is effective against multiple fungi such as powdery mildew, late blight, apple scab and rusts. Absorbed through the banana tree's roots it moves through the leaves to keep fungus at bay. Referred to as Methyl (E)-2-{2-[6-(2-cyanophenoxy) pyrimidin-4-yloxy]phenyl}-3-methoxyacrylate), azoxystrobin has a low toxicity to most avian, aquatic and terrestrial animals.


Imidacloprid - Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid, which acts as a neurotoxic insecticide. This chemical compound, 1-(6-chloro-3-pyridylmethyl)-N-nitroimidazolidin-2-ylideneamine, can be used as a seed treatment or applied topically, and is effective against soil, chewing and sucking insects, according to the National Pesticide Information Center, a joint body between the EPA and Oregon State University.

Complications of pesticides in banana plantations

Although most growers see pesticide use as critical to the success of banana farming, critics point to the detrimental effects that these chemical compounds have had on animals near the plantations, such as crocodiles in Costa Rica. Fish have died in large numbers as well.  Specialists work with banana plantations to reduce the amount of pesticides used and introduced to the wild life through improper use.

Author:  Chris Boyd, Chem Service Inc  August 2014

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Apple bans some chemicals from IPhones | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards | Greyhound Chromatography

Learn about the chemicals that Apple has banned from its iPhones

August, 2014, technology giant Apple announced it would ban the use of benzene and n-hexane from its creation of iPhones, iPads and other devices. Following petitions from activist groups Green America and China Labor Watch, and an investigation of 22 manufacturers that found no harmful levels of these two chemicals, Apple said that it would recommend to its suppliers that the two chemical compounds were longer to be used. The devices will be tested following production to ensure compliance.

The ban will affect Apple suppliers and manufacturers in China, Ireland, the U.S. and Brazil. Although benzene and n-hexane are used in similar devices from other companies, the criticism of its use was focused on Apple. As a researcher, chemist or curious iPhone user, you may be wondering why benzene and n-hexane were singled out in the chemical-rich manufacturing process. Here is some helpful background information on these two chemical compounds.

Benzene
Whether or not most Americans are aware, benzene is in a significant number of products and commodities in the U.S. The American Cancer Society explained that benzene is among the 20 most widely used chemicals, and is found in products ranging from plastics, rubbers and dyes to gasoline exhaust and cigarette smoke.

Firefighters, printers, lab technicians, steel workers and researchers are likely to be exposed to benzene, which can be harmful to those who deal with it regularly. This chemical compound is a known cause of cancer, the ACS noted, with particular ties to Leukaemia. Benzene causes cancer, Anaemia or other conditions by inhibiting normal function of human cells. Early symptoms of benzene poisoning or exposure include dizziness, headaches and confusion, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Colourless and liquid at normal temperatures, benzene is flammable and smells sweet. It is created through natural as well as man-made means, including from volcanoes or burning fuel. The process of burning of benzoic acid, C6H5CO2H, leads to benzene, C6H6.

People can also come into contact with benzene through gasoline fumes, exhaust from factories, or in contaminated food or drinking water. Benzene is an important and useful substance in modern chemistry, primarily for production of certain products. But, its negative effects on workers and communities underscore the importance of safe and correct use.

n-Hexane
Made from crude oil, n-hexane is similar to a solvent in its uses. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry at the CDC pointed to the extraction of vegetable oil from crops such as soy as a major use of n-hexane. This chemical compound, C6H14, is colourless and highly flammable, like benzene. However, it has a bad odour.

Used in gasoline, rubber cement, textiles, furniture, shoes and printing, n-hexane is a common chemical compound. Most people will have come into at least a small amount of n-hexane through breathing gasoline exhaust. Inhalation can easily lead to exposure for people who are working with the chemical, which highlights the importance of safe lab and manufacturing practices when working with volatile chemicals.

Unlike benzene, n-hexane is not known to lead to cancer, but prolonged exposure has been known to damage the nervous system.

Other Apple chemical changes
Although the elimination of these chemicals was likely tied to the petition filed by activists, this move has been one among many lately for Apple that reduce the use of potentially harmful chemicals. CNN reported that Apple has also made efforts toward safer chemical use by eliminating PVC from certain power cords, design displays that do not use mercury and products without brominated flame retardants.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT  www.greyhoundchrom.com  Tel:  +44 (0) 151 649 4000  

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

ПАСПОРТ БЕЗОПАСНОСТИ ХИМИЧЕСКОЙ Russian MSDS Chem Service | Greyhound Chromatography

ПАСПОРТ БЕЗОПАСНОСТИ ХИМИЧЕСКОЙ  Russian MSDS Now Available for Chem Service Products

Chem Service are pleased to offer multi lingual MSDS, including Russian, from their website www.chemservice.com

If you require a MSDS in a language other than English and do not see it on Chem Service's website; www.chemservice.com please email us at info@greyhoundchrom.com and we will provide a translated copy as soon as possible.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT buy on-line www.greyhoundchrom.com

CHEM SERVICE STANDARDS YOU CAN RELY ON

High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials

Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses

Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)

Certification backed with experience: Nearly 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :
ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

KARTA BEZPEČNOSTNYCH UDAJOV Slovakian MSDS Chem Service | Greyhound Chromatography

KARTA BEZPEČNOSTNYCH UDAJOV Slovakian MSDS Now Available for Chem Service Products



Chem Service are pleased to offer multi lingual MSDS, including Slovakian, from their website www.chemservice.com


If you require a MSDS in a language other than English and do not see it on Chem Service's website; www.chemservice.com please email us at info@greyhoundchrom.com and we will provide a translated copy as soon as possible.


Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT buy on-line www.greyhoundchrom.com


CHEM SERVICE STANDARDS YOU CAN RELY ON


High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials
Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses
Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)
Certification backed with experience: Nearly 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :

ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

FICHA DE DATOS DE SEGURIDAD Spanish MSDS Chem Service | Greyhound Chromatography

FICHA DE DATOS DE SEGURIDAD Spanish MSDS Now Available for Chem Service Products



Chem Service are pleased to offer multi lingual MSDS, including Spanish, from their website www.chemservice.com
If you require a MSDS in a language other than English and do not see it on Chem Service's website; www.chemservice.com please email us at info@greyhoundchrom.com and we will provide a translated copy as soon as possible.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT buy on-line www.greyhoundchrom.com

CHEM SERVICE STANDARDS YOU CAN RELY ON

High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials

Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses

Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)
Certification backed with experience: Nearly 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :

ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

SÄKERHETSDATABLAD Swedish MSDS | Chem Service | Greyhound Chromatography

SÄKERHETSDATABLAD Swedish MSDS Now Available for Chem Service Products



Chem Service are pleased to offer multi lingual MSDS, including Swedish, from their website www.chemservice.com

If you require a MSDS in a language other than English and do not see it on Chem Service's website; www.chemservice.com please email us at info@greyhoundchrom.com and we will provide a translated copy as soon as possible.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT buy on-line www.greyhoundchrom.com

CHEM SERVICE STANDARDS YOU CAN RELY ON

High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials

Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses

Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)
Certification backed with experience: Nearly 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :

ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

GUVENLIK BILGI FORMU Turkish MSDS | Chem Service | Greyhound Chromatography

GUVENLIK BILGI FORMU Turkish MSDS Now Available for Chem Service Products



Chem Service are pleased to offer multi lingual MSDS, including Turkish, from their website www.chemservice.com

If you require a MSDS in a language other than English and do not see it on Chem Service's website; www.chemservice.com please email us at info@greyhoundchrom.com and we will provide a translated copy as soon as possible.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT buy on-line www.greyhoundchrom.com

CHEM SERVICE STANDARDS YOU CAN RELY ON

High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials

Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses

Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)

Certification backed with experience: Nearly 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :

ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

ПАСПОРТ БЕЗПЕКИ Ukranian MSDS | Chem Service | Greyhound Chromatography

ПАСПОРТ БЕЗПЕКИ Ukranian MSDS Now Available for Chem Service Products


Chem Service are pleased to offer multi lingual MSDS, including Ukranian, from their website www.chemservice.com

If you require a MSDS in a language other than English and do not see it on Chem Service's website; www.chemservice.com please email us at info@greyhoundchrom.com and we will provide a translated copy as soon as possible.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT buy on-line www.greyhoundchrom.com

CHEM SERVICE STANDARDS YOU CAN RELY ON

High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials

Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses

Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)

Certification backed with experience: Nearly 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :

ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

VARNOSTNI LIST Slovenain MSDS | Chem Service | Greyhound Chromatography

VARNOSTNI LIST Slovenain MSDS Now Available for Chem Service Products


Chem Service are pleased to offer multi lingual MSDS, including Slovenian, from their website www.chemservice.com

If you require a MSDS in a language other than English and do not see it on Chem Service's website; www.chemservice.com please email us at info@greyhoundchrom.com and we will provide a translated copy as soon as possible.

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT buy on-line www.greyhoundchrom.com

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Soap and Detergent Impact on the Environment | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards Supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Common Soaps and Detergents May Not be Harmful to the Environment

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards available from Greyhound Chromatography

 

Soap and detergent are two of the most ubiquitous products used in everyday life. Children are taught to wash their hands before eating. Laundry soap is sold on the promise of cleaning clothes while keeping colours from fading. Dishwashing is a chore that often becomes a point of contention among roommates. Ultimately, it is hard to imagine going a day without using any these products or their chemical compounds.

However, once soap and detergent have served their purposes, they are immediately washed away and down the drain. For years, environmental scientists have been concerned about the impact of surfactants on the environment. Recently, one team of researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark reviewed more than 250 studies on the subject, and concluded that the surfactants of the most common soaps and detergents, once treated properly, pose minimal harm to the environment, as published in the journal Critical Reviews in Environmental Science.

Why is there worry over cleaning products?
According to the study authors, surfactants have a unique property that allow them to dissolve fat while acting soluble in water. The quantity of surfactants released into the environment alone is enough to cause concern over the effects of these chemical compounds.

"We humans use several million tons of surfactants a year on a global scale. It amounts to billions of kilos, so these are substances that you really don't want to release into the environment unless you're thoroughly familiar with them," Aarhus University senior researcher Hans Sanderson said in a statement.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency listed two main groups of surfactants: those that have positive environmental characteristics, and those that are of concern. Compounds in the former group biodegrade into compounds that have low toxicity. Linear alcohol ethoxylates or betaine esters are examples that fall into this category. Meanwhile, compounds that are of concern are toxic to aquatic life, persist in the environment and degrade into by products that are harmful. Examples include alkylphenol ethoxylates, which degrade into alkylphenols that can potentially disrupt the endocrine system.

Additionally, many of the cleaning products that contain these surfactants also contain phosphorus or phosphates, which can promote algae growth if they enter lakes, rivers and oceans. The algae eventually deplete the oxygen in the water and kill off aquatic life.

Vigilance still matters
After reviewing the studies within the scope of their investigation, the authors of the new study concluded that the surfactants in common soaps and detergents pose minimal risk to the environment as long as the wastewater has been properly treated.

"The substances are made so that they degrade rapidly and thus don't pose a risk to the environment," Sanderson said in a statement. "I can't think of any other substances released into the environment in such large amounts via everyday use by all of us. It's the most commonly used substances of all that go directly into the wastewater, so it's important to keep track of them and ensure that there are no unpleasant surprises in the treatment plants or in the environment."

The EPA has several tips for consumers to practice good environmental stewardship when it comes to buying and using soaps and detergents. The agency recommends using only the appropriate load-size settings on the washing machine, running washing machines and dishwaters only when they have full loads, and adding no more detergent than necessary.

When it comes to phosphorus, the EPA encourages consumers to choose only products that are phosphate free. According to the Washington Department of Ecology, 16 states in the U.S. passed laws that significantly restricted the amount of phosphorus allowed in dishwashing detergent. However, such policies are not uniform throughout the country, and do not affect the illegal importation of soaps with high levels of phosphorus. While treatment plants can remove some phosphorus from wastewater, a significant amount of it may be left behind.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Surfactants from Fracking | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards Supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Surfactants from Fracking may not be as harmful as previously thought

                             

The strength of the U.S.'s energy policy depends in part on the diversity of its sources. Relying too much on any one source, particularly foreign fossil fuels, makes the nation vulnerable, which is why the federal Department of Energy is investing in developing other avenues for generation energy. These include solar, wind, geothermal power, nuclear power, hydropower and natural gas.

Domestic production of natural gas has been a particularly contentious environmental issue because of the use of the hydraulic fracturing process, which is also known as fracking. The chemical compounds and drilling procedures used in fracking have raised concerns about the potentially negative impact on air quality, seismic activity and water sources. Given the rising interest in natural gas, research teams across the U.S. are working to learn more about the different facets of the fracking process.

One team of scientists from the University of Colorado Boulder decided to study the surfactants that are used in fracking fluids. They concluded that these organic chemicals are no more harmful than what is already found in common household products, as published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

Half of natural gas to come from shale by 2035
According to the U.S. Department of Energy, shale is a type of sedimentary rock that can act as a rich source of natural gas. The federal agency estimated that, by 2035, nearly half of the natural gas in the U.S. will come from shale. To maximize the amount of extractable natural gas from shale, some drilling companies have resorted to fracking, a process that forces various fluids down drilling wells. Environmental scientists have been concerned about fracking for several reasons, including the possibility that the chemicals mixed in with the drilling fluids will contaminate groundwater sources.

Federal and state regulations now require fracking companies to disclose the formulas of the drilling fluids they use, but businesses have been reluctant to do so because they use proprietary blends. Instead of releasing detailed formulas, they disclosed mixtures of general chemical categories, including surfactants.

To investigate further, the authors of the new study collected fluid samples through partnerships between their institution and Colorado State University. They used state-of-the-art mass spectrometry to analyze the surfactants in the fluid samples, and concluded that they were no more harmful than the chemical compounds found in products such as laxatives, toothpaste and ice cream.

"This is the first published paper that identifies some of the organic fracking chemicals going down the well that companies use," lead study author Michael Thurman, a co-founder of the Laboratory for Environmental Mass Spectrometry in CU-Boulder's College of Engineering and Applied Science, said in a statement. "We found chemicals in the samples we were running that most of us are putting down our drains at home."

Another reason why this study might be significant is that it demonstrated a way that researchers can "fingerprint" the unique proprietary blends of drilling fluids that fracking companies use. Such information will be useful in case of actual environmental contamination.

Caution is still necessary
Despite results indicating that the surfactants in the fracking fluid samples used for this study are not dangerous, the researchers were careful to point out that individual companies will modify their formulas depending on the geology of their drill sites. Additionally, the scientists cautioned that studies on fracking's impact on air pollution, seismic activity and water contamination from antimicrobial biocides must continue.

As of September 2012, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that it was supporting 18 ongoing research projects investigating the impact of fracking. These studies touch upon the effect of withdrawing large volumes of water from potential drinking water supplies, the consequences of potential fracking fluid spills, the potential for drinking water contamination and the repercussions of inadequate wastewater treatment.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Impact of Lawn Care on the Environment | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards Supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Urbanization study helps track impact of lawn care on our environment

                                    

There are few luxuries that homeowners take pride in as much as their lawns. These gardening projects have been part of the quintessential American home picture since suburban communities first sprang up. These days, well-manicured lawns have become more ubiquitous thanks to urbanization across different landscapes and climates.

The popularity of lawns has raised concerns among environmental scientists. They require lots of water, which puts high pressure on the supplies of drought-stricken regions, and contributes to runoff pollution. Between pesticides and nutrient-rich fertilizers, lawn care may significantly contaminate watersheds.

To find out more, a multi-institutional team of scientists studied the lawn care practices of residents from six cities across the U.S., as published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Algae blooms are a danger
One reason why lawn care was of interest to the study's authors was the potential for fertilizers to enter local watersheds through polluted runoff. Many of these fertilizers contain large amounts of phosphorus and nitrogen, both of which contribute to algae blooms. This is problematic because abnormal algae growth in lakes, rivers and oceans gradually depletes the oxygen supply of the water. This kills off fish and other forms of life, creating what are known as "dead zones." This oxygen-poor water poses a major threat to the local ecosystem. Furthermore, algae can contaminate drinking water supplies with harmful toxins.

Eleven institutions led by Clark University surveyed about 9,500 households in Los Angeles, Phoenix, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Miami, Baltimore and Boston to learn more about lawn care practices in the U.S., including fertilizer use. The researchers asked questions pertaining to fertilizers and irrigation, and accounted for differences in climate and socioeconomic factors.

Results showed that 79% of respondents watered their lawns, and 64% used fertilizer.

"These numbers are important when we bear in mind that lawns cover more land in the United States than any other irrigated crop," study co-author Peter Groffman, a scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, said in a statement. "What we do in our suburban and urban yards has a big impact, for better or worse, on the environment."

Other results showed that fertilizer use was similar in Boston and Miami, which both have different climates. Data from Los Angeles and Phoenix, which were the driest cities, revealed there was a positive correlation between irrigation and affluence.

Individual actions make a difference
Ultimately, the study authors asserted that studies like this are important because they provide information on the sustainability of urbanization.

"The management of urban and suburban areas has a direct impact on water resources, carbon storage, and the fate of pollutants, like nitrogen and phosphorus," Groffman said in a statement. "Yards are also where our environmental knowledge, values, and behavior are likely generated. The good news is that individual actions, on a yard-to-yard-basis, can make a difference."

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, there are several ways to fertilize lawns without flooding the runoff with harmful chemical compounds. For example, consumers can buy slow-release products, as well as fertilizers that mainly use natural organic compounds. To help prevent runoff, these products should be applied away from sidewalks and driveways, where they can wash off. The federal agency also suggests that clippings be left on the lawn after mowing. This allows the old plant material to act as a natural fertilizer.

In an effort to conserve water, people who are about to start growing their lawns should mix compost into the soil to help it retain water. It may be ideal to plant seeds for grass that is drought-tolerant.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Medical equipment may expose premature babies to phthalate - Chem Service Certified Reference Standards Supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Medical Equipment May Expose Premature Babies to Phthalate

Any baby that is born before the 37th week of gestation is considered to be premature. These infants tend not to be as developed as babies from full-term pregnancies, and are at major risk for both short-term and long-term health complications. It is very common for these children to require hospitalization after being born. Once they are placed in the neonatal intensive care unit, they are housed in incubators and connected to various machines that are all designed to keep them safe, warm and healthy as they struggle to thrive.

However, the chemical compounds used during the manufacturing of these devices may actually have harmful effects, according to scientists from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Specifically, the di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate may potentially cause inflammation and other negative reactions, as published in the Journal of Perinatology.

What is DEHP?
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency defines DEHP as a plasticizer used in the manufacturing of polyvinylchloride and other products, such as cellulose, rubber and styrene. Essentially, DEHP makes these products more flexible.

As a phthalate, DEHP has the potential to disrupt the endocrine system and cause inflammation to the liver, brain, eyes and lungs, which is why municipal water companies make an effort to monitor levels of this substance in drinking supplies. According to the EPA, the maximum contaminant level of DEHP in drinking water is 6 parts per billion. The most likely source of water contamination is discharge from rubber or chemical factories. Water treatment plants may use granular activated carbon to remove excessive DEHP from drinking supplies.

'They're struggling to survive'
According to the March of Dimes, the list of long-term health complications that may develop among premature newborns includes apnea, respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, anemia, necrotizing enterocolitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and infections. In the short term, it is crucial that doctors and parents make sure these babies stay warm and gain between 1/2 and 1 ounce per day to become strong.

Considering much of the medical equipment in the NICU – catheters, intravenous tubing, endotracheal tubes, fluid and blood bags – is made with DEHP, the authors of the new study analyzed potential phthalate exposure levels for premature infants. They discovered that the daily exposure to DEHP for infants weighing about 2 kilograms in the NICU was 16 milligrams per kilogram a day. Most of this exposure was attributable to blood products and ventilation tubes. These levels are considered 4,000 times higher than the threshold for potential male reproductive toxicity, and about 160,000 times higher than the threshold for liver damage.

The researchers also observed that premature infants who do not need a ventilator often fare better than those who do. They suggested that DEHP exposure may have something to do with this observation.

"We were floored by how high the exposures are when you look at all the devices together," co-investigator Mary Fox, Ph.D., MPH, said in a statement. "It's a population that we know is vulnerable to begin with. They're struggling to survive. And the concern now is whether this phthalate exposure is actually contributing to their problems when these medical products are supposed to be helping them get better."

Fox and her colleagues suggested that hospitals need to start replacing DEHP-containing products in the NICU with items made of alternative materials. Additionally, hospital managers need to address DEHP exposure from sources such as vinyl flooring and paints, and the cosmetics used by either the medical care team or visitors, including lotions, soaps and powders.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

How do oil palm plantations affect the environment? - Chem Service Certified Reference Standards Supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

How Do Oil Palm Plantations Affect the Environment?

Around the world, eutrophication of rivers, lakes, streams and oceans is increasingly becoming a prominent environmental concern. Fertilizer nutrients and other chemical compounds are contaminating these water sources after washing away from residential lawns, public gardens and agricultural lands. Once in the watershed, phosphorus, nitrogen and similar nutrients promote abnormally robust growth of algae. When the algae eventually rot, the decomposition process depletes the oxygen supply in the water, causing fish and other organisms to die off, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

As eutrophication gets worse around the world, environmental scientists and farmers are working to improve agricultural practices to reduce nutrient pollution in runoff. One team of scientists from Stanford University decided to focus their research on oil palm plantations in Indonesia. They concluded that this cash crop not only contributes to global warming, but also to the contamination of freshwater, as published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences.

Where does palm oil appear?
According to the study authors, the palm oil industry is worth billions of dollars. In addition to being used as a cooking oil, this commodity is used in the production of peanut butter, bread, shampoo, shaving cream and other staple items found in the typical grocery store.

One reason why palm oil is drawing so much attention from environmental scientists is that plantations are taking up more land, particularly in Indonesia. The nation is home to the world's third largest rainforest, and it's the producer of half the global supply of palm oil. According to PricewaterhouseCooper Indonesia, the production of crude palm oil in Indonesia increased 182 percent between 2000 and 2010. As for the land itself, PwC projected that the amount of area devoted to oil palm plants would increase from nearly 8 million hectare in 2010 to about 13 million hectare in 2020.

This could be detrimental to the environment for several reasons. Turning diverse rainforest habitats into monocultures mainly devoted to one form of plant life upsets the native ecological balance and reduces the local flora's ability to absorb carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. Additionally, pesticides wash away in the runoff, and contaminate the watershed. Fertilizers contribute to nutrient pollution and eutrophication.

Monoculture is as bad as clearcutting
​Previously, the Stanford researchers studied the impact of oil palm monoculture on greenhouse gases. To find out how this crop affects the environment, they compared water samples from streams the flowed through plantations to samples from the federally protected Gunung Palung National Park. They discovered that water near the plantations was 4 degrees Celcius warmer than that which flowed through the rainforest. Additionally, the former source had sediment concentrations that were 550 times greater, and levels of oxygen depletion that were bigger during a drought.

"Local communities are deeply concerned about their freshwater sources," study co-author Lisa Curran, a professor of ecological anthropology at Stanford, said in a statement. "Yet the long-term impact of oil palm plantations on freshwater streams has been completely overlooked until now. We hope this work will highlight these issues and bring a voice to rural communities' concerns that directly affect their livelihoods."

"Our findings suggest that converting logged forests and diverse smallholder agricultural lands to oil palm plantations may be almost as harmful to stream ecosystems as clearing intact forests," co-author Kimberly Carlson said in a statement.

To help improve agricultural practices related to the cultivation of oil palms, the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil and other organizations suggested that natural vegetation be allowed to grow in areas near streams. Additionally, dense road networks should not intersect near waterways. However, Curran and Carlson noted that more protection may be needed.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Cyflufenamid (CAS# 180409-60-3) - Chem Service Certified Reference Standards Supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Cyflufenamid (CAS# 180409-60-3) is now available from Chem Service, Inc.

Chem Service, Inc. is now offering Cyflufenamid (CAS# 180409-60-3, or Chem Service N-13132 & S-13123A1). In addition to providing top-of-the-line fungicide and pesticide standards, Chem Service has 50 years of experience, knowledgeable chemistry experts and a proven track record of quality, high purity chemicals.

Cyflufenamid is a phenyl-acetamide that is used as both a protective and curative measure against powdery mildew that attacks outdoor ornamental plants, as well as cucurbit vegetables, pome fruit, low growing berries and grapes. It was first registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in June 2012.

The aerobic soil half-life of the fungicide is between 7 and 408 days. It is stable in anaerobic soil. Its adsorption rate is between 1,934 and 3,087 milligrams per liter, and is considered to be persistent with low mobility in the soil.

Cyflufenamid may potentially contaminate both surface water and groundwater through spray drift and runoff, and can harm both fish and aquatic invertebrates. The EPA considers the fungicide likely to be carcinogenic, but its chronic population adjusted dose should help avert any carcinogenic effects. Occupational exposure to cyflufenamid presents a low acute toxicity risk for workers, but protective eyewear is needed to prevent moderate eye irritation in case of contact. Long-sleeve shirts, pants, socks and shoes are also advisable during application to protect the skin.

Cyflufenamid has the chemical formula C20H17F5N2O2. Its International Chemical Identifier is InChI=1/C20H17F5N2O2/c21-15-9-8-14(20(23,24)25)17(18(15)22)19(27-29-11-13-6-7-13)26-16(28)10-12-4-2-1-3-5-12/h1-5,8-9,13H,6-7,10-11H2,(H,26,27,28)/f/h26H/b27-19-.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Metamifop (CAS# 256412-89-2) - Chem Service Certified Reference Standards Supplied by Greyhound Chromatography

Metamifop (CAS# 256412-89-2) is now available from Chem Service, Inc.

Chem Service, Inc. is now offering the herbicide Metamifop (CAS# 256412-89-2, or Chem Service part number N-13084-25MG). In addition to providing top-of-the-line herbicide and pesticide reference standards, Chem Service has 50 years of experience, knowledgeable chemistry experts and a proven track record of quality, high purity chemicals.

Metamifop is an acetyl-Coenzyme A carboxylase inhibitor that belongs to the group of aryloxyphenoxy propionates. It induces chlorosis selectively in weeds, and insufficient chlorophyll production makes it difficult for the plant pests to thrive.

Previously, research published in the Pakistan Journal of Weed Science Research demonstrated that Metamifop is excellent for weed control in direct seeded rice farming. Unlike transplant rice farming, direct seeded rice germinates alongside plant pests, increasing the amount of competition for resources needed to grow. This underscores the importance of weed control, and in an experiment conducted at Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Metamifop was shown to be superior than standard Cyhalofop butyl in the control of weed species, such as Echinochloa colona, Echinochloa crus-gulli (L.), Panicum repens, Cyperus rotundus and Heteranthea limosa.
In theory, manual weeding is best, but when it comes to direct seeded rice, labor costs and weed regeneration make manual methods unpractical. Meanwhile, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations projects global rice production for 2014-2015 to be 496.4 million tonnes, which is down 0.4 percent from the 2013-2014 projection. Erratic weather conditions are partly to blame for the challenges to rice farmers, and the minimization of any pests, including weeds, will become pivotal.

So far, there is no data that marks Metamifop as a carcinogen, mutagen, endocrine disrupter, neurotoxicant, respiratory tract irritant or acetyl cholinesterase inhibitor in humans. However, it has induced tumors in animal studies published in the journal Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology. It is also a possible eye irritant and may cause skin sensitization in humans.

Metamifop has the chemical formula C23H18ClFN2O4. Its International Chemical Identifier is InChI=1/C23H18ClFN2O4/c1-14(22(28)27(2)20-6-4-3-5-18(20)25)29-16-8-10-17(11-9-16)30-23-26-19-12-7-15(24)13-21(19)31-23/h3-14H,1-2H3/t14-/m1/s1.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

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Tuesday, May 01, 2018

Chem Service Pesticide Reference Standards | Greyhound Chromatography

Rethinking Chemical Reactions for Sustainability and Cost Savings - Chem Service Pesticide Reference Standards

Chem Service Inc offer over 2000 Pesticides and Metabolites. Over 95% of Chem Service's neat standards grade materials have a purity of 98% or greater.

With increasingly restrictive governmental regulations and greater environmental concerns, many industries, scientists and farmers may start moving away from solvent-based chemical reactions to mechanical ones. Already popular in parts of Asia and Europe, researchers from the University of Cincinnati are working to improve the process among U.S. users, according to the school.

Mechanochemistry as effective as solvents


​University of Cincinnati Associate Professor of Chemistry James Mack has spearheaded U.S. research into the process of mechanochemistry compared to traditional chemistry which uses solvents. Mack and his researchers discovered that although significantly louder, this method is just as effective and carries fewer consequences. Mack is set to speak at the International Symposium on Mechanochemistry in Hefei, Anhui, China on June 6 and 7.

Funded by the Chemical Structure, Dynamics and Mechanisms grant from the National Science Foundation, Mack found that mechanochemistry was effective because it allowed chemicals to get the energy they need through impact to mix at a molecular level without solvents.

This discovery is significant because of the current impact and cost associated with solvents. Some solvents are released into the atmosphere or environment while mixing chemicals. This can lead to a greater amount of pollution. Additionally, solvents often become waste that's expensive to dispose of properly.

Rather than paying significant sums to dispose of used chemicals, paying for expensive new solvents and purchasing new materials to facilitate the experiments, Mack explained that mechanochemistry allows people to reuse equipment and cut back on chemical expenses.

"By reducing the solvent used in the process, you reduce the total amount of waste that's generated in a chemical reaction under traditional chemistry methods," Mack said in a statement. "It's a new way of understanding chemistry … Our goal is to understand the ramifications of not having a solvent – how things are the same, how things are different – and if we can develop a knowledge base of chemistry using this methodology, then we might be able to replace some of the traditional processes that are currently used."

This type of potential "green chemistry" could be especially important to pharmaceutical sciences where the amount of solvents needed for reactions can far outweigh the active chemicals needed.

Yale scientists make new palladium catalyst


Researchers from Yale University have also been working on ways to improve chemical reactions. Published in the journal ACS Catalysis, the study outlined a new chemical catalyst that allows scientists to use fewer materials and spend less money.

Yale scientists created a new palladium catalyst. Palladium, a rare metal that's often used in catalytic converters, has also emerged as a successful catalyst for a number of chemical compounds such as plastics, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals. However, because this metal is rare, palladium is expensive. Prior to Yale's discovery, palladium catalysts also were prone to deactivation.

This new catalyst uses less palladium, making it more sustainable and less costly. Additionally, it provides a greater infrastructure for chemical reactions and is less likely to lead to deactivation.

"We have developed an improved system that is less prone to deactivation," study co-author Nilay Hazari, an associate professor of chemistry at Yale, explained in a statement. "It should make the preparation of many industrially relevant compounds more economical and sustainable and may lead to new methods to prepare important compounds."

Save money on chemical disposal


With recent rule changes from the Environmental Protection Agency it's become increasingly expensive to properly dispose of the chemicals used for reactions. To cut costs many businesses and labs are deciding to reassess the way they're using their chemicals.

Many people have resorted to using their solvents in a specific way to allow them to be more easily recycled. Clean Harbor explained that there are a few chemical solvents that are recycled the most often. Aliphatic hydrocarbon solvents, aromatic hydrocarbon solvents, alcohols, chlorinated solvents, ester solvents, Ketones, n-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidine and Tetrahydrofuran are among the most popularly recycled solvents according to Clean Harbor.

Additionally, many labs have begun using Web services to connect with one another to share reagents and other chemicals critical to their work. Consider talking to your team about reevaluating the way you dispose of your chemicals in favor of a more efficient and cost-effective method.

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

                  
Greyhound Chromatography is pleased to supply Chem Service Certified Reference Standards to Research and Analysis laboratories worldwide.

The benefits of using Chem Service Certified Reference Standards:

High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials
Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses      
Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)
Certification backed with experience: 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :
ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

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Tuesday, May 01, 2018

The Future of Fracking? |Greyhound Chromatography Laboratory Supplies

                                                  Fracking images

Fracking is an abbreviated phrase describing the process of hydraulic fracturing, which uses water and other chemicals to extract natural gas out of shale rock.

Although it has been proven as a successful method for energy extraction in the USA, questions have been raised with regards to the environmental impact on the surrounding areas for residents and conservationists due to the toxicity of the chemicals that are used in the fracking fluid.

One of our suppliers ChemService reported last month that more studies need undertaking on the chemicals that are used in fracking fluid, as there are many unknown quantities and some concentrations could have potentially adverse effects.

Here in the UK it’s very much a hot topic if we adopt these fracking processes ourselves, as numerous sites have been identified including Lancashire and at Barton Moss, bringing the issue close to home.

Manchester Science Festival 2014, which is currently underway until 2nd Nov are hosting a wealth of fabulous events celebrating all things science related in and around the Manchester area.

On Tuesday 28th October at the Museum of Science & Industry, Discuss, the home of the intellectually curious will be hosting a debate on Fracking and bringing all the issues to the table. On the panel will be Happy Mondays band member, and aspiring politician Bez alongside two professors from the university of Manchester on opposing sides of the debate as well as a leading Blackpool business woman.


Join the conversation with @mcrscifest and @discussMCR #msf14

Chem Service Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Greyhound Chromatography and Allied Chemicals, 6 Kelvin Park, Birkenhead, Merseyside, CH41 1LT Email: info@greyhoundchrom.com

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

Tel: +44 (0)151 649 4000
Web: www.greyhoundchrom.com

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Twitter: @greychrom
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Monday, April 30, 2018

New Mussel Pesticide | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards | Greyhound Chromatography Certified Reference Standards

Michigan residents excited for new mussel pesticide

Zebra mussels are an invasive species that originated in Russia. Named for their yellow and brown stripes, these small fresh water mollusks were first discovered in the U.S. Great Lakes in 1988, The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources explained.

Carried to these large fresh water bodies from the ballast of a ship, these mussels have quickly become a plague to the region. The Minnesota DNR explained that zebra mussels can hurt other aquatic wildlife including other mussels.

"Zebra mussels also can impact the environment of lakes and rivers where they live," The DNR explained. "They eat tiny food particles that they filter out of the water, which can reduce available food for larval fish and other animals, and cause aquatic vegetation to grow as a result of increased water clarity. Zebra mussels can also attach to and smother native mussels."

Since they first emerged in 1988, these mussels have spread throughout the Great Lakes, many smaller lakes and the Mississippi River. In addition to hurting wildlife, zebra mussels can also clog pipes, damage boats and interfere with power plants.

New pesticide for zebra mussels
A new pesticide may be ready to take on this unwanted guest, Michigan Live reported recently. Zequanox, a reduced-risk aquatic pesticide, is being sold to kill zebra and quagga mussels. Made by Marrone Bio Innovations, Zequanox may be a game-changer for Michigan and surrounding communities.

The pesticide has been found to kill nearly all zebra mussels as well as the similar quagga muscles that are also unwelcome, Michigan Live reported, but leaves nearly all other aquatic organisms unharmed. The pesticide has been approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on open water as well as in pipes.

This new pesticide has been in development for years and one of a newer class of biopesticides. Zequanox works by tricking the mussels, Michigan Live explained. Whereas chorine- or chemical-based pesticides would be sensed by the mussels who could close their bodies, the new pesticide is built using dead microbe cells and therefore the mussels siphon them into their body. They eat the pesticide as food where it then kills them through the digestive system. It can take up to a month before they die.

"There's a great deal of interest in Michigan among state agencies and people who live on lakes following the Zequanox development," Sarah LeSage, aquatic invasive species coordinator for the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, told Michigan Live.

Although the product seems to be effective in the region and many were happy with a recent field test, treating the entire lake at this point is cost-prohibitive. Although price varies, it may not be suitable for all businesses and communities so far. More research may need to be done, but many are excited at the prospect of this new pesticide.

Tips for keeping these mussels at bay
Many of the techniques for limiting the damage of zebra mussels actually has nothing to do with pesticides. While these chemicals are effective at killing this invasive species where it currently exists, a key aspect to stopping the problem is to limit the spread of this pest. The Minnesota DNR recommended that people clean the debris from their boat after use and before moving it to a new body of water. Scrubbing mussels and other debris off the hull can keep it from spreading.

In addition to scrubbing the hull, boat owners should be prepared to empty any water sources on the boat from ballasts to livewells. Zebra mussels can be as small as 1/4 an inch. The DNR also recommended 21-day dry docking to kill off any potential mussels left behind.

If you know our company you will know that for over 30 years Greyhound has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. We hold ISO 9001:2008 Certificate No: RS 30332 for the supply and stockholding of analytical reference standards, chemicals, chromatography columns and related accessories. Our Certified Reference Standards are supplied by Guide 34 accredited manufacturers.


If you don’t know us, please visit our website www.greyhoundchrom.com we have access to over 1 million products – including the largest catalogue of Certified Reference and Analytical standards in the world.
Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Agriculture, Chemical, Environmental, Food, Forensics, Petrochemical, Chemical, Life Sciences and Pharmaceutical analysis, holding stock of many popular products for prompt delivery via our extensive logistics network.

  3 Most Common Pesticides Report


Greyhound prides itself on personal service which provides prompt, efficient, cost-effective, safe delivery of all products. With state-of-the art facilities and highly trained staff, Greyhound provides technical advice and distribution of Chromatography consumables across all disciplines. Our service is designed to provide a wide range of products, to help our clients to achieve excellent, cost-effective results. Greyhound manufactures its own range of Capillary Columns, Syringe Filters, SPE Columns and HPLC Columns, the 'Q' Range, as well as representing the industry’s best known manufacturers.


By working with the industry’s best known manufacturers we are able to tailor products to customer requirements and supply products on behalf of Biosolve; Chiron; Chromacol; Chem Service (Environmental and Pesticides); EP Scientific; Extrasynthese, Hach Lange, Hamilton; High Purity Standards; Jour Research; Larodan Fine Chemicals; Macherey-Nagel; National Scientific; PAH Reference Standards; Pfaltz and Bauer; Regis Technologies; Rheodyne; RT Corporation; Samco Scientific; SGE; SGT Filters; Sigma Aldrich, Fluka and Supelco, Sillicycle, Speciality Gases, Upchurch; Valco and Wellington Laboratories. We offer a full range of chromatography and laboratory consumables, if you visit our website and do not see what you require please contact us and we will do our best to source your requirements for you.

Our services include; Chemical Standards; Chiral Chromatography; Derivatives Analysis; Solvents; Dioxins/Furans/PCBs/PBDEs; Environmental Analysis; Gas Filters; GC; GC-MS; LC-MS; HPLC; ICP, ICP-MS, AA; Ion Chromatography; Lamps; Prep Silica; Reagents; SPE Solid Phase Extraction; SPME Solid Phase Micro-Extraction; Syringes; TLC Thin Layer Chromatography; Valves; Vials/Caps/Septa.

Our sales team is available to discuss your requirements in detail, from the application of products, to sourcing and prompt delivery. We are able to source hard to find chemicals which are no longer commercially available and are able to supply over 13,000 laboratory chemicals in small, convenient units. We offer generous discounts for bulk orders and call off orders, we can work with you to consolidate shipments.


Sunday, April 29, 2018

EU Declares Ban on Bee Harming Neonicotinoid Pesticide | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards | Greyhound Chromatography Laboratory Supplies

EU Declares Ban on Bee Harming Neonicotinoid Pesticide

                                             

Member states have voted in favour of an almost complete ban on the use of neonicotinoid insecticides across the EU.

Scientific studies have long linked their use to the decline of honeybees, wild bees and other pollinators.

The move represents a major extension of existing restrictions, in place since 2013.

Manufacturers and some farming groups have opposed the move, saying the science remains uncertain.

Neonicotinoids are the most widely used class of insecticides in the world, but concerns about their impact on bees have been reinforced by multiple research efforts, including so-called "real world" trial results published last year.

Change of heart

Back in 2013 the European Union opted for a partial ban on the use of the three chemicals in this class: Imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam.

The restrictions applied to crops including maize, wheat, barley, oats and oil seed rape. The newly agreed Commission regulation goes much further, meaning that almost all outdoor uses of the chemicals would be banned.

Voting on the proposal had been postponed a number of times as countries were split on the move. However, Friday's meeting saw a qualified majority vote in favour of the ban.

The action has been driven by a recent report from the European Food Safety Authority (Efsa), which found that neonicotinoids posed a threat to many species of bees, no matter where or how they are used in the outdoor environment.

"The Commission had proposed these measures months ago, on the basis of the scientific advice from the European Food Safety Authority," said EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, Vytenis Andriukaitis.

"Bee health remains of paramount importance for me since it concerns biodiversity, food production and the environment."

Another key element that helped push the vote through was the UK's change of heart on the use of these insecticides. Environment Secretary Michael Gove announced last November that Britain would now support further restrictions.

"I think it has helped the dynamic," Franziska Achterberg from Greenpeace told BBC News.

"It has helped sway Ireland definitely, and then lately, the Germans, the Austrians and the Dutch. I think the fact the UK had come around was a good signal for them as well, that they could not stay behind."

Growers will only be free to use neonicotinoids in greenhouses across the EU, despite some environmental groups having reservations about the chemicals leaching into water supplies. Other neonicotinoids, such as thiacloprid, will continue to be exempt from the ban.

Environmental campaigners have welcomed the ban. Some five million people around the world had signed petitions calling for an extension of restrictions.

"Banning these toxic pesticides is a beacon of hope for bees," said Antonia Staats, from Avaaz,

"Finally, our governments are listening to their citizens, the scientific evidence and farmers who know that bees can't live with these chemicals and we can't live without bees."

No benefits for bees

Many farmers are unhappy about the increase in restrictions, saying they do not believe they are warranted on scientific grounds and that the existing partial ban has not delivered results.

"The Commission hasn't been able to find that these restrictions have delivered any measurable benefits for bees," said Chris Hartfield from the National Farmers' Union (NFU) in the UK.

"That has been a big question for us, and if we can't be certain they can deliver measurable benefits why are we doing this?"

The new regulation will be adopted in the coming weeks and will be applicable by the end of the year. Some farmers believe it will have significant impacts on the types of crops grown across the Continent.

"The irony of the current restrictions is that it has led to the decline of oil seed rape being grown in the UK and that's reflected across the whole of Europe," Mr Hartfield said.

"We're not decreasing our consumption of that product; we are just importing it from outside Europe, where it is often treated with neonicotinoids. I would expect to see that continue."

Some campaigners believe that the extended ban heralds a new era for EU farmers where the needs of the environment are seen as more important than production.

"It's a significant indication that we need a different form of farming across Europe that farms with nature and not against it," said Sandra Bell from Friends of the Earth.

"The ban on neonicotinoids could be a really important step towards a more general questioning of the use of pesticides and the harm they are doing to our environment."

Chem Service Inc offer over 2000 Pesticides and Metabolites. Over 95% of Chem Service's neat standards grade materials have a purity of 98% or greater.


Quality Standards
Chem Service provides Certificates of Analysis for Standards Grade pesticide and metabolite standards in accordance with internal policy requirements and ISO Guide 34, ISO 17025 and 9001 Quality System Requirements. Chem Service's neat chemical certification policy states that purity and identification must be established independently by performing three or more (when feasible) seperate analyses before neat products are certified. More than 95% of Chem Service's neat grade products or as solutions, are certified for purity, identity, stability and are traceable by lot.


With over 50 year's experience Chem Service is a name you can trust.

Greyhound Chromatography is pleased to supply Chem Service Certified Reference Standards to Research and Analysis laboratories worldwide.

For details of supply restrictions in your country please email sales@greyhoundchrom.com

Some common insecticides

Acetamiprid Part No: N-11009

Acetamiprid Solution Part No: S-11009A1

Clothianidin Part No: N-11493

Clothianidin Solution Part No: S-11493A1

Dinotefuran Part No: N-11788 

Dinotefuran Solution In Methanol  Part No: S-11788M1

Dinotefuran Solution In Toluene Part No: S-11788U1

Furathiocarb Solution Part No S-12974

Thiamethoxam Part No N-13562

Thiamethoxam Solution Part No S-13562M1


For over 35 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

2,chloro-a-(4-fluorophenyl)-Benzenemethanol | CAS# 362-55-0 | Chem Service Certified Pesticide Reference Standard | New Product

NEW PRODUCT RELEASE

2,chloro-a-(4-fluorophenyl)-Benzenemethanol CAS# 362-55-0

                        

                     

Chem Service Inc offer over 2000 Pesticides and Metabolites. Over 95% of Chem Service's neat standards grade materials have a purity of 98% or greater.

Quality Standards

Chem Service provides Certificates of Analysis for Standards Grade pesticide and metabolite standards in accordance with internal policy requirements and ISO Guide 34, ISO 17025 and 9001 Quality System Requirements. Chem Service's neat chemical certification policy states that purity and identification must be established independently by performing three or more (when feasible) seperate analyses before neat products are certified. 

More than 95% of Chem Service's neat grade products or as solutions, are certified for purity, identity, stability and are traceable by lot.


With over 50 year's experience Chem Service is a name you can trust.


For over 35 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Pesticides: Know before you Grow and Test before you eat | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards | Greyhound Chromatography Laboratory Supplies

Everyone from big commercial farms

Chem Service

Before you start planting crops, everyone from big commercial farmers down to little DIY home gardeners should know how to use pesticides appropriately. While being an important part of gardening, pesticides can easily be mismanaged and ultimately affect both the environment and your own health. There have been countless studies regarding both the pros and cons of the use of various chemicals, but at the end of the day, just a little education can go a long way.

Provided below are some basic pesticides facts that you need know before you grow, and test before you eat:

Know before you grow
First things first, you need to be aware of how to properly maintain healthy soil to help support your local environment and habitat. The U.S. Department of Agriculture explained that improper pesticides use in agriculture often results in contamination of local water supplies – this is due to either leaching or runoff, which seep into ground water or surface water. It's important to note that studies have revealed that these pesticides have been found not just in agricultural areas, but also urban areas as well, noted the source. This means that even the smallest gardener needs to ensure they are using their products appropriately.

Before you start planting your plot – regardless of size – you need to carefully read the directions on the product's label, warned the National Pesticide Information Center. This will prevent you from using the wrong chemicals on your property. It's crucial to do careful homework before using pesticides because conditions vary from area to area.

The Environmental Finance Center at the University of Louisville explained that there will are three common ways in which people are exposed to contaminants: Ingestion, physical contact and inhalation. This is another reason why you need to carefully read labeled instructions. All three of these actions could happen during the gardening process, whether you accidentally rub your face and get some in your mouth, or touch and inhale them as you work. Length of exposure affects health conditions, so you need to be cautious as you work.

Pesticides levels are at their highest when you first use them, as they tend to break down with weathering and processing, and should be handled accordingly as such. However, by the time the food reaches your table – depending if you followed directions appropriately, of course – the chemicals should be a legal limit, explained the California Department of Pesticide Regulation.

Test before you eat
Before you start chowing down on your fresh produce, you need to do your part in removing as many pesticides from the products prior to consumption. The Environmental Protection Agency does its part in testing chemical levels before food hits grocery store shelves, but it's still necessary for you to take precautions as well. First, consider what foods have the highest toxin levels. Every year, the Environmental Working Group releases a list of the "Dirty Dozen." This is a guide of the pesticides in produce for shoppers to consult before selecting their seasonal fruits. This year, strawberries topped the list for highest amount of post-harvest chemical residue. What can you do? Sonya Lunder, EWG Senior Analyst gave some clean eating insight in the Dirty Dozen's release.

"Fruits and vegetables are important for your health," Lunder explained. "But for those on the Dirty Dozen, we recommend buying the organic versions if you want to avoid pesticides on your food."

You don't have to stop buying strawberries, or other Dirty Dozen produce, you simply have to be smart about how you treat them before you and your family consume them. Always rinse or thoroughly scrub the surface of produce, FoodInsight.org shared. Scrubbing produce with firmer skin will dissolve that waxy layer of residue, but you can also peel skin off to get rid of that layer as well. While all foods should be rinsed properly, just know that any produce you buy that is on the Dirty Dozen list should receive a little extra attention.

CHEM SERVICE OFFER A FULL RANGE OF CUSTOM STANDARDS, PREPARED TO YOUR SPECIFICATION.

  CHEM SERVICE PESTICIDE CATALOGUE 2018

  CHEM SERVICE FULL CATALOGUE 2018

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

Contact Us!

Tel:      +44 (0)151 649 4000
Web:   www.greyhoundchrom.com
Email: info@greyhoundchrom.com

Follow us!

Twitter:       @greychrom
Facebook: www.facebook.com/GreyhoundChromatography
Google+:    www.google.com/+Greyhoundchrom
YouTube:    www.youtube.com/GreyhoundChrom

Monday, April 23, 2018

DIN German Standard Methods| Chem Service Certified Reference Standards | Greyhound Chromatography

DIN German Standard Methods

Identification and measurement of pesticides in water, waste water and sludge.

DIN German Standard Methods Download PDF

Chem Service Inc offer over 2000 Pesticides and Metabolites. Over 95% of Chem Service's neat standards grade materials have a purity of 98% or greater.

Quality Standards

Chem Service provides Certificates of Analysis for Standards Grade pesticide and metabolite standards in accordance with internal policy requirements and ISO Guide 34, ISO 17025 and 9001 Quality System Requirements. Chem Service's neat chemical certification policy states that purity and identification must be established independently by performing three or more (when feasible) seperate analyses before neat products are certified. More than 95% of Chem Service's neat grade products or as solutions, are certified for purity, identity, stability and are traceable by lot.

                            With over 50 year's experience Chem Service is a name you can trust.

                                                                                          

For over 35 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

Greyhound Chromatography is pleased to supply Chem Service Certified Reference Standards to Research and Analysis laboratories worldwide.

Visit  www.greyhoundchrom.com to view the full range of Chem Service products.

  Chem Service Full Catalogue 2018

   CHEM SERVICE PESTICIDE CATALOGUE 2018

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

2,4,5,-Trichlorophenyl diethylphosphinothioate | New Product | Chem Service Certified Reference Standards

2,4,5,-Trichlorophenyl diethylphosphinothioate

New Certified Reference Standard from  Chem Service

For over 30 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.
Greyhound Chromatography is pleased to supply Chem Service Certified Reference Standards to Research and Analysis laboratories worldwide.

The benefits of using Chem Service Certified Reference Standards:

High Quality: High purity chemicals for use as certified reference materials
Cost Effective: Products packaged in small quantities to minimize expenses
Wide Selection: 1,200 pesticide and metabolite reference standards (including banned and discontinued items)
Certification backed with experience: 50 years of experience. ISO 9001:2008 : ISO/IEC 17025:2005 certification :
ISO Guide 34:2009 For Organic Reference Material

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Testing Plastic in Food Contamination | Analytical Reference Standards | Chem Service | Greyhound Chromatography

On Feb 12th, European regulation 2018/213 amended UE regulation 10/2011 on the level of Bisphenol A in plastic food contact materials. The Specific Migration Limit (SML) of these materials has been reduced from 0.6 to 0.05 mg Bisphenol A/kg. The amendement will be applicable on Sept 6th, 2018.


Chem Service offer a full range of Certified Reference Standards.  Customised Standards supplied to you individual specifications.

New Analytical Reference Standards - Amiprofos Methyl, Pyraclonil, Pyrethrin l, Pyrethrin ll, Pyrethrum

Established in 1962 Chem Service is the largest independent supplier of Analytical Reference Materials and the original source of small quantities of organic chemicals.

Over 95% of Chem Services’ neat Standards Grade materials have a purity of 98.0% or greater.

Chem Services’ worldwide customers are found in the chemical, government, food quality, agricultural and life science research communities.

Chem Service's range of products are constantly increased as they keep up to date with the fast moving pace of Environmental testing.  You can see Chem Service's full range of products on our website. www.greyhoundchrom.com

New Products of Note:

   

Chem Services’s products are for laboratory use only and are not for use in humans.

Contact Us!


Tel:        +44 (0)151 649 4000
Web:      www.greyhoundchrom.com
Email:     info@greyhoundchrom.com

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Analytica 2018, April 10-13 2018, Messe Munchen | Greyhound Chromatography

Analytica 2018, April 10-13 2018, Messe Munchen

Greyhound Chromatography will be exhibiting at Analytica 2018, the 26th International Trade Fair for Technology, Analysis, Biotechnology and analytica conference.

For over 35 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to research and analysis laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range of products covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.

Analytica combines the entire laboratory world in science and industry, bringing together scientists and professionals from Environmental, Pharmaceutical, Chemical, Diagnostics & Medicine, Food Analysis, Materials Processing, Energy, cosmetics, Bio Informatics and Bioanalysis research and analysis sectors.

Join us for the latest Chromatography news and products from all of the above sectors.

Whether you are familiar with the range of products we have to offer or if our company is new to you please come to our stand and find out what we are able to supply to you. 

We look forward to seeing you in Munich.

Susan Massie

Marketing Director, Greyhound Chromatography

Wednesday, November 08, 2017

Amiprofos Methyl Analytical Reference Standard | CAS 36001-88-41 | Greyhound Chromatography

Amiprofos Methyl - Analytical Reference Standard

Buy Amiprofos Methyl in small 50mg quantities.Ordering in small quantities allows you to order only what you need, when you need it.  Buying in small quantities reduces the need for storage as well as minimising waste and its disposal.

CAS 36001-88-41

Synonym: N-[methoxy-(4-methyl-2-nitrophenoxy)phosphinothioyl]propan-2-amine

        

Established in 1962 Chem Service is the largest independent supplier of Analytical Reference Materials and the original source of small quantities of organic chemicals.

Over 95% of Chem Services’ neat Standards Grade materials have a purity of 98.0% or greater.

Chem Services’ worldwide customers are found in the chemical, government, food quality, agricultural and life science research communities.

Chem Service are pleased to offer Amiprofos Methyl in small 50mg quantities. 

                

For over 35 years Greyhound Chromatography has been supplying high quality Chromatography consumables to laboratories around the world. Greyhound’s extensive range covers all areas of Environmental, Petrochemical, Food, Forensics, Chemical and Pharmaceutical analysis. Backed by a highly experienced technical services team, Greyhound is the preferred source amongst today’s analysts.


Greyhound Chromatography is pleased to supply Certified Reference Standards from the world's leading manufacturers to Research and Analysis laboratories worldwide.

Chem Services products are for Laboratory use only and are not for use in humans.

Please note that some products supplied by Greyhound Chromatography may not be available in your country due to geographical supply restrictions.

Contact Us!

Tel:                +44 (0)151 649 4000
Web:              www.greyhoundchrom.com
Email:            info@greyhoundchrom.com

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